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queisser
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
queisser   1/13/2011 9:26:47 PM
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Yeah, okay, but where can I get my poodle clipped in Burbank?

selinz
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
selinz   1/11/2011 12:38:01 AM
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Remote sensing thermometers have been available for quite some time. Cook your meat while watching the football game... See http://www.amazon.com/RediCheck-Remote-Cooking-Thermometer-Settings/dp/B0000AQL24/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&qid=1294706172&sr=8-2-spell which sells for around $30. The gimick is that it can be read from your ipod/touch/pad...

David Ashton
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
David Ashton   12/29/2010 9:59:12 PM
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In Arthur C Clarke's 3001 he referred to a device called the "Autochef" which produced food on demand, suitably nutritionally balanced for the user. Maybe the iGrill is just a step towards this. It's not too much of a stretch of imagination to envisage buying your meat with a sensor implanted in it (something like an RFID chip) and you just pop it in your (suitably enabled) oven and dial up how you want it done, and the oven will switch off and tell you when your rare beef roast is done just how you like it. (I'd go for that, I never get it as rare as I'd like... I should patent this....) And let's face it - they are putting microcontrollers in even the humble toothbrush these days. So is there anything which won't have one in eventually?

Duane Benson
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
Duane Benson   12/29/2010 9:35:49 PM
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Years ago, who would have thought that you could build an electronic music device small and inexpensive enough to put into a greeting card. Now, you can buy cards just about anywhere that play music when opened. What does that have to do with this article? Well, the iGrill may be just the first step. It won't be long before those little metal pop-up things that tell you when your turkey is done can be replaced by a little wireless temperature sensor. How long before the whole sensor, power and transmitter cost a buck or less? The turkey factories could insert them during manufacture, just like they do with the pop-ups we have now. Certainly, if you could do that, it wouldn't be a stretch to see the same little sensors sold to consumers to plug into roasts or other foods as well. In terms of whether this is a solution waiting for a problem, I don't see it as such. Salmonella doesn't seem to be as common these days as it was a few years ago, but such a device could help to further reduce that ailment, while at the same time, giving cooks more control over the cooking process.

LarryM99
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
LarryM99   12/27/2010 4:10:29 PM
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Sometimes it's hard to tell the difference between the useful and the silly. The epitome was the Internet-enabled toaster, which put a browser on the front of the device. In that form it was silly, but turn it into a device which uses connectivity to report its status (not too different from this) and it might make sense. Larry M.

UdaraW
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
UdaraW   12/26/2010 11:02:58 PM
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I agree with Mark on this point. In recent times, people have moved so far away from the concept of simplicity. As history will tell you, more often than not it is the simplest engineering solution that will stand the test of time. Why all this sophisticated complications when a simple timer+alarm can get the job done? Engineering is not for recreation. I am a believer that engineering must serve a purpose for the society at large. Other than being a recreative/fun activity for the engineering team that had designed this jinx, I do not see the society benefiting from such product. There are far more severe and acutely felt human problems out there that engineers ought to spend their creative hours on.

DrQuine
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CEO
re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
DrQuine   12/26/2010 5:51:00 PM
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I think this is another brilliant example of expanding a single platform (iPhone) to solve many problems. I believe this is the basis of the viral success of iPhone apps: they solve a wide range of problems with a familiar interface. While some solutions, such as iGrill, require a supplementary hardware sensor, many others (for example the digital level, flashlight, and checking the ink level on my HP inkjet printer) are entirely enabled by the components already within the iPhone. The essential point is that the number of interfaces to carry and learn is reduced to a single handheld device.

David Ashton
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
David Ashton   12/26/2010 7:27:46 AM
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Well nearly. In a comment on something else some time ago, I described an electric fence unit I made for a friend...old valve radio transformer back to front, charged a cap to 100V on one half cycle and fired it thru a thyristor to a car ignition coil with the filament winding on the other half cycle. What has this to do with Frank Zappa? Well my friend's name was Frank, so we called it Frank's Zapper....

Mark Wehrmeister
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
Mark Wehrmeister   12/26/2010 6:22:45 AM
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This seems like another high tech solution to a low tech problem. Another in a long line of high tech temperature measurement devices to help cook food. What about a simple timer/alarm that is already available on the iPhone and similar gadgets. The timer tells you when to check the food and a low-tech thermometer or other visual or tactile test will tell you if the food is done. Does anyone else think this is a solution looking for a problem?

UdaraW
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re: Call any rib roast, call it by name
UdaraW   12/25/2010 4:11:53 AM
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I agree with prabhakar_deosthali over there. These concepts of ubiquitous computing are more of value in demanding situations where differently-abled and mature demographics are concerned rather than as mere leisurely addendums to our already luxurious lifestyles. When reduced to practise in these much needed application areas these technologies will considerably improve the living standards of a larger number of suffering human beings in the planet. It is rather funny that many i*** type of products find market success when much much more utilitarian (and humanitarian) type of products fail miserably in the market.

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