Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 3   >   >>
Ramanathan.G
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
Ramanathan.G   7/17/2011 4:37:47 AM
NO RATINGS
Sounds interesting. HDD has serious reliability issue due to the mechanical parts.

luizsalomon
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
luizsalomon   1/6/2011 4:55:38 PM
NO RATINGS
Come on!!! Most of us here are engineers and we now that SSD can hold a certain amount of data, for long enough. The only problem is that it can't cycle - erases and writes. That's why you put an OS into the SSD and have all the swaps, temps, virtual, backups and everything that cycles a lot, on a magnetic thing. That's it. Talking about capacity, this issue should be brought back in another 5 years. I have a hard drive that's 5 years old and has only 20GB. Moore's Law!!!! Now, go back to work!

sharps_eng
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
sharps_eng   1/6/2011 10:52:31 AM
NO RATINGS
@SEofLC - now if that doesn't highlight the need for a handy international weight reference for comparison... I'd say 10gm is nearly a third of an ounce... 150 drips of water... can anyone think of a handy electronics-based object to use as a an internationally available weight reference, other than the gramme itself? Luckily I know the phrase 'nickelled and dimed to death' but can your car 'turn on a sixpence'?

SEofLC
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
SEofLC   1/5/2011 8:35:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Nevermind... 4 dimes or 2 nickles = 9 grams.

SEofLC
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
SEofLC   1/5/2011 8:15:56 PM
NO RATINGS
10 grams? Really? Or did someone loose a significant digit?

ReneCardenas
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
ReneCardenas   1/5/2011 1:25:07 AM
NO RATINGS
I have over a dozen laptops and a handful of desktops. Yes, most laptops don't age well, starting with battery wear, then hard drive crashes, panel bad pixels and so on. My estimate that every 3 to 5 years most users replace their main computer has been accurate. However, with the masses moving to super phones this issue is going to be diluted some more. Boot time was a concern in early systems due to self test and other legacy starting enumeration. However, with portable devices been less flexible those issues will fade to a minimum and little relevance when comparing netbooks vs. super tablets. IMHO.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
krisi   1/4/2011 4:57:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Baolt: I agree. Most people I know use laptop for less than 5 years. Personally I get a new one once every two years. Unless you are vigilant about what software you are installing on your machine no PC will be effectively useful after 5/10 years. The replacement cost will be very low and the cost of making the old machine work too high...Kris

pixies
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
pixies   1/4/2011 4:27:03 PM
NO RATINGS
I don't think magnetic media last over archeological time especially. It has been imaged with MFM that domain walls migrate even at room temperature. Anyway, how long a magnetic drive last is inconsequential since the electronic parts, the mechanical parts, and control software will not be able to last a 100 year anyway. I have been contemplating this question recently, the only sure way to pass your photos to the grandchildren is still to print them out then put them in a fireproof box.

Baolt
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
Baolt   1/4/2011 12:30:33 AM
NO RATINGS
Who would use a laptop/Pad more than 5 years or even 10 years? If id keep my first toshiba running i guess id be really really patient guy or not? :) SSDs are digital based, logic based structures, of course have problem of loosing some data (bits) by time, but with great respond speed, would let OS to boot up in a glance. If someone would like to store data, wait up cloud is almost here, or go for Blu-rays they also offer much reliable storage.

selinz
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel launches solid-state drive
selinz   1/3/2011 7:28:49 PM
NO RATINGS
It's hard for me to imagine paying that much of an overhead for a flash drive. It seems as though my computers are pleny fast enough for pretty much anything I do, particularly if you got your DRAM loaded up to 8 or 16 gigs.

Page 1 / 3   >   >>


Flash Poll
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer

Future Engineers: Don’t 'Trip Up' on Your College Road Trip
Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer
3 comments
A future engineer shares his impressions of a recent tour of top schools and offers advice on making the most of the time-honored tradition of the college road trip.

Max Maxfield

Juggling a Cornucopia of Projects
Max Maxfield
7 comments
I feel like I'm juggling a lot of hobby projects at the moment. The problem is that I can't juggle. Actually, that's not strictly true -- I can juggle ten fine china dinner plates, but ...

Larry Desjardin

Engineers Should Study Finance: 5 Reasons Why
Larry Desjardin
37 comments
I'm a big proponent of engineers learning financial basics. Why? Because engineers are making decisions all the time, in multiple ways. Having a good financial understanding guides these ...

Karen Field

July Cartoon Caption Contest: Let's Talk Some Trash
Karen Field
140 comments
Steve Jobs allegedly got his start by dumpster diving with the Computer Club at Homestead High in the early 1970s.

Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)