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krisi
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
krisi   4/9/2011 8:31:47 PM
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I am not sure I understand your concern DrQuine. Are you afraid this tiny cell would explode mid-air? I think a bottle of high proof alcohol is more likely to create more damage, and that is even licensed for internal; consumption!...Kris

DrQuine
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
DrQuine   4/8/2011 11:16:41 PM
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Any consumer product will need to be certified safe for travel (and ideally operation) in commercial aircraft. Will that be possible for a device operating at such a high temperature? What would happen if there were a car crash while such a device were in use by a passenger? If the safety issues can be resolved, certainly a long life power source will be much appreciated by our "plugged in" world.

Abrahim
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
Abrahim   4/7/2011 6:44:43 AM
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given the above comments and the obvious inadequate half baked info provided in the article i guess its ok if we ignore this one and move on.

Robotics Developer
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
Robotics Developer   4/7/2011 12:57:31 AM
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I am still wondering how it operates at 510C? I assume that it must either be: heated or generate the heating from the fuel. Does this lower the achieved efficiency? And further, how does this device work in real life,510C is quite hot..

krisi
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
krisi   4/6/2011 6:05:49 PM
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Larry, I don't think you feed fuel to those cells...it is one time charge...Kris

LarryM99
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
LarryM99   4/6/2011 4:31:04 PM
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The missing piece here is that fuel cells need to be fed fuel to operate. I think that we are all curious as to what fuel these would consume and mechanically how it would be fed to chip-type fuel cells. Does anyone know? Larry M.

prabhakar_deosthali
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
prabhakar_deosthali   4/6/2011 7:21:09 AM
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What is the life of such a battery? If such battery has to replace a Lithium battery then the expected life should be around 5 years. This concept is very good for batteries used in medical implants like pace makers. Are these batteries explosion proof and safe to use in medical devices?

GREATTerry
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
GREATTerry   4/6/2011 6:55:51 AM
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What does it mean with power rating at high temperature? Does it mean the battery can harvest heat energy into electricity? But what will the source for 510 degrees C? It would be useful if anyone can explain how this fuel cell works.

eewiz
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
eewiz   4/6/2011 3:52:28 AM
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"achieving a power density of 155 milliwatts per square centimeter (at 510 degrees Celsius)" temperature a bit too high probably. Unless they can build proper heat dissipation mechanisms into the battery itself. Anyone know whats the power density for typical Li-Po battery used in cell phones etc? quick google search shows numbers in wide range from 0.5-75 mW/Cm^2!

yalanand
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re: Fuel-cell-on-a-chip demonstrated
yalanand   4/6/2011 2:22:42 AM
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Wow, This is really cool technology. Heartly congratulations to the team. So is it the end of an era for the good-old lithium batteries ?

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