Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 2
PHW_#1
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel tips 22-nm tri-gate, but mobile is MIA
PHW_#1   5/5/2011 6:24:20 AM
NO RATINGS
TSMC not IBM/GF (even more behind) can only achieve Intel's 45nm high k/metal gate specs. Not to mention intel's 2nd generation high k/metal gate spec. So we are talking 2 generation gap. 3D FINFET is a brandnew design flow, I am wondering whether design community is ready to handle such technology.

PHW_#1
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel tips 22-nm tri-gate, but mobile is MIA
PHW_#1   5/5/2011 6:20:05 AM
NO RATINGS
another great innovation.

rfab
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel tips 22-nm tri-gate, but mobile is MIA
rfab   5/5/2011 3:12:07 AM
NO RATINGS
TSMC Chairman Morris Chang said at the meeting in the first quarter of France, said TSMC 28 nanometer low-power (LP) process and high performance (HP) process reliability verification operations have been completed, which means that the company's 28 Chennai M the mass production process is no longer any obstacles the road, in the TSMC advanced process of development, is a very important milestone. -------- originally clamored for so many years of 28NM, production does not

sxs537
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel tips 22-nm tri-gate, but mobile is MIA
sxs537   5/4/2011 9:13:20 PM
NO RATINGS
I meant "2X performance advantage on the core side"....sorry for the typo

sxs537
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel tips 22-nm tri-gate, but mobile is MIA
sxs537   5/4/2011 9:12:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Says Who?? IBM/GF/TSMC etc are just starting their 32/28nm and then they indicated that they would be ready with 3D transistors at 14 nm node. So they have to go through a 22/20 nm node in between before they get there. Intel has atleast a 3-4 year advantage if not more. Also ARM architecture is inherently more power efficient since it is designed that way (low power with commensurate performance hit). They are successful because they can do an SoC (the whole ecosystem) better than Intel currently does. So ARM should be very concerned by this.... not that they cannot compete but Intel now is in the same power envelope and has atleast a 2X power advantage on the core side. Whether Intel can execute to the whole SoC part is the question. They did acquire pieces (like comms with Infinieon and graphics) in the last year or so. The space is now really interesting.

markhahn0
User Rank
Rookie
re: Intel tips 22-nm tri-gate, but mobile is MIA
markhahn0   5/4/2011 8:35:24 PM
NO RATINGS
multigate is great, but IBM/AMD/TSMC are surely quite close to production as well. since everyone will have 3d/multigate in about the same timescale, including foundries producing ARM, it's hard to see how this gives Intel any significant advantage. after all, ARM has a _design_ advantage in performance-for-power, which Intel can't catch up with via a transient fab upgrade...

resistion
User Rank
CEO
re: Intel tips 22-nm tri-gate, but mobile is MIA
resistion   5/4/2011 7:01:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Well something's gotta give. If the fins are spaced too close, the thick gate would be squeezed in between, which would be a new complication.

<<   <   Page 2 / 2


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Want to Present a Paper at ESC Boston 2015?
Max Maxfield
8 comments
I tell you, I need more hours in each day. If I was having any more fun, there would have to be two of me to handle it all. For example, I just heard that I'm going to be both a speaker ...

Martin Rowe

No 2014 Punkin Chunkin, What Will You Do?
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
American Thanksgiving is next week, and while some people watch (American) football all day, the real competition on TV has become Punkin Chunkin. But there will be no Punkin Chunkin on TV ...

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
13 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Martin Rowe

Book Review: Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design
Martin Rowe
1 Comment
Controlling Radiated Emissions by Design, Third Edition, by Michel Mardiguian. Contributions by Donald L. Sweeney and Roger Swanberg. List price: $89.99 (e-book), $119 (hardcover).