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graduatesoftware
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
graduatesoftware   6/26/2011 1:39:41 AM
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Incidentally, in reference to earlier comments related to unsprung mass, see the viewpoints from Protean Electric: http://www.proteanelectric.com/img/files/protean-Services-1008121453598281250.pdf http://ev.sae.org/article/9493

graduatesoftware
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
graduatesoftware   6/26/2011 1:26:15 AM
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Refer to patent number: 7595574 http://www.google.com/patents/about?id=q9rIAAAAEBAJ&dq=exro+technologies When I investigated this in the past, the technology appeared to be quite sound and a great way to eliminate mechanical gear boxes. There are, of course, concerns over the cost of copper and magnets. Also see the LaunchPoint motor (which uses Litz wire instead of PCB, but I think PCB is a good approach and there are others employing PCBs for stators and even rotors). http://www.launchpnt.com/portfolio/aerospace/uav-electric-propulsion/

green_is_now
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
green_is_now   5/19/2011 7:06:13 PM
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The subtlty is the rdson will be bigger for the worst case (parallel) requirement but will be an extra efficiency loss when in series times # in series. Butt this idea has a bank account of efficiency and cost savings to draw down from in removing weight and mechanical transmission. Just can't give up more than ~75% of these advsntages to be viable. I think it has legs.

roldan
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
roldan   5/18/2011 10:04:29 AM
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With brushless motors, you have to reverse the current as the rotor turns. The switch from series to parallel is done at the same time as this current inversion. But you're right. As this design requires many transistors in series, each Rdson has to be as small as possible.

green_is_now
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
green_is_now   5/17/2011 9:30:18 PM
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There is a dual design for the battery pack.

green_is_now
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
green_is_now   5/17/2011 9:28:40 PM
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Yes the motor wire length would be the same for all "gears"

green_is_now
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
green_is_now   5/17/2011 9:27:22 PM
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I think he means interconnect wires, not all would be in circuit at all times just those to allow "gear chosen"

green_is_now
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
green_is_now   5/17/2011 9:25:16 PM
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Because when you switch in and out transistors from series to // the voltage rating and the current ratings must be able to handle the worst case. So when in // voltage worst case...this sets the Rdson (higher voltage higher rdson). Whne these are put in series then you will have excesive voltage drop compared to a series only design.When in sries the current is max (per xstr)and the die area must be larger. But it may still be better considering all the benifits. Lots of semiconductor cost, again may be offset.

roldan
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
roldan   5/17/2011 12:56:39 PM
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I am not convinced that this requires more wires. The torque and the power of the motor are proportional to the length of the wires. So, for the same power, you need same length. The difference is that you have to split the same wire length into different pieces, in order to connect them in series or in parallel.

WKetel
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re: Electric hub motor improves EV range: Part 2—Manufacturability and practical application
WKetel   5/16/2011 10:04:55 PM
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Even if this design did require a greater bandwidth, the frequency is low enough that almost any transistor of adequate ratings can handle the job. But the big advantage is that it is still cheaper than actual gears, and the switching function is both cheaper than gears and not requiring mechanical shifting. So really it is quite elegant. It needs a few more wires, but that is certainly cheaper than gears and mechanical shifting, which would still require wires and power transistors, plus, the powered shifting mechanism would use much more power.

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