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Michael.Bergman
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
Michael.Bergman   5/18/2011 6:57:14 PM
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We're totally on the same page. My reaction was, "Never again." Their ASIC business closed, but they still make other kinds of chips. I don't flat-out refuse to consider their product, but on the other hand, if there is an alternative, I do sort of lean that way.

Brickman0
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
Brickman0   5/18/2011 1:06:32 PM
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I know you probably won't name the ASIC company, but the flippant response they gave you really irks me. If I hear that someone has had problems with say a certain appliance manufacturer, car etc, they will never get my business. The ASIC company was at fault and should have owned up to it right away. Anything less is reason to go somewhere else.

Shallowford
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
Shallowford   5/16/2011 12:26:52 PM
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A coworker came up with a complement of the 5 Why process. The "5 Who" process used to determine "Who will pay?" First it got a laugh and then we realized that, more often than not, it reflected reality.

WKetel
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
WKetel   5/14/2011 10:59:23 AM
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The fact is that while the customer is NOT always right, THEY ARE the ones with the money. I have showed customers that the "build to print" they supplied would not work, and that customer was grateful, responding with a PO to make the design work. But not all sales weasels are as cooperative as they were at that employer.

anon6223816
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
anon6223816   5/13/2011 7:03:21 PM
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I heard that one as "the customer is NOT always right, but the customer is always the customer". Makes sense that way, sort of.

zeeglen
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
zeeglen   5/13/2011 1:02:38 AM
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Many years ago (at a company I am no longer with) the salesheads pressured engineering into a product modification which they them sold to customers prior to a repeat of RF emissions testing to FCC Part 15. My own project had been suddenly canceled and I got pulled into the mess when the subsequent RF emissions testing revealed that the modified product vastly exceeded allowable FCC radiated limits. After I did much physical and mechanical redesign and got the product to pass FCC testing, sales response was "How do we explain to the customers why they need to make this change? Can't you fix the problem without having to make all these changes?" To which I basically replied "That's YOUR problem. YOU decided to sell the modified product prior to emissions testing."

David Ashton
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
David Ashton   5/12/2011 11:29:53 PM
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With friends ("Team" members?) like that, who needs enemies....

Michael.Bergman
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
Michael.Bergman   5/12/2011 8:16:48 PM
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Sadly, yes. No commissions for the engineers, either. Where's the justice? When I'm king, engineers will get commissions and salespeople will take blame.

Michael.Bergman
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
Michael.Bergman   5/12/2011 8:16:09 PM
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They were quite skilled! "This is our fault, and this is our fault, and that over there? It's our fault too!" Maybe 'skilled' isn't the word...'consistent'?

Michael.Bergman
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re: Knee deep in exploding mice
Michael.Bergman   5/12/2011 8:15:23 PM
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Great rules! But unfortunately, the rule we were using was, The customer is always right (no matter how wrong).

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