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The Gen
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
The Gen   6/16/2013 8:28:11 AM
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I worked for a company for 12 years designing a range of fibre optic switches. (check out the spelling of fibre!) My bit was the opto-mechanics. I can sympathise deeply with the sentiments in these posts. Guys, I feel your pain. One of the posts earlier mentioned that it is obvious when mechanics isn't working, but not so software and electronics. In the fibre switch, the mechanics was small and delicate, and small mechanical disturbances (thermal, vibration, electrical noise) could make a difference but it wasn't obvious by observation. When there was a problem the blame was assigned thus:- 1. it's a mechanical problem, the mirror is in the wrong place (it was once many years previously but not on the five plus subsequent problems) 2. Right, the mechanics is OK, must be an electrical problem 3. Right the electrics is OK, must be a software problem Usually the 'head in charge would decide on what the root cause was and waste time and money trying to fix something that wasn't broken. The three disciplines had enough respect for each other to get on and sort the problem (eventually when the management "help" had evaporated when the solution was looking intractable) Oh, and I relate to the story above about the saw project that was estimated to take 2 months scheduled to be done in one month and quoted to the customer as 2 weeks. I don't work for that company any more :-)

m.cheah
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
m.cheah   11/3/2012 12:35:08 AM
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The solution seems to be that SW guys need to learn more HW skills and vice versa. It's the ones that are at ease straddling disciplines that bridge the divide and I've certainly seen this in action.

DutchUncle
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
DutchUncle   6/10/2011 12:29:50 PM
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Fresh real-life example: A few weeks ago I released code that worked exactly as expected on prototype hardware. When used on the next board-spin of prototypes, it didn't work, which of course meant it was a software fault. Yesterday it was proven that not only was the circuit changed, but a wrong part had been used on the dozen proto builds, so it wasn't even the proper changed circuit. Put in the right part, and the software works again. Gee, what a concept.

jsandjs
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
jsandjs   6/9/2011 11:03:27 PM
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This is the second story about the hardware induced noise I read here. Since noise mixed in a signal is so common and most of the time it is random, problems happen here and there somehow give a hint, even not strong and clear. A specific software in general will hardly produce random troubles here and there.

zeeglen
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
zeeglen   5/29/2011 4:53:51 PM
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Depends on what is being tested and debugged.

t.alex
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
t.alex   5/29/2011 1:07:22 PM
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Isn't it true most of the time the sw guy do the test and debugging instead of the hardware?

t.alex
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
t.alex   5/29/2011 1:06:15 PM
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It is important the sw guy pick up some hardware debugging to prove themselves 'innocent' :)

LiketoBike
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
LiketoBike   5/27/2011 6:26:01 PM
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Software and hardware are often trained by management to blame each other :-) (As in: when the "real" mission to create and ship and SUCCEED [as a team] is derailed into the "fake" mission to grab credit and avoid fault, this blame-game usually results...)

J Kosin
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
J Kosin   5/27/2011 2:58:19 PM
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I look at it a bit differently. Without hardware, software is useless and without software, hardware is pretty lame. It is the cooperation of both the hardware and software that makes a well designed system; which is our goal ultimately for software and hardware.

J Kosin
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re: It always worked before, so you broke it
J Kosin   5/27/2011 2:40:46 PM
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Unfortunately, it is a loose-loose situation. Sorry to bring you bad news.

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