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eric-odessit
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
eric-odessit   6/8/2011 4:28:39 PM
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I never thought of that. But I usually do it through my shirt anyway. But you are right, perhaps I should be more careful. Thanks. Eric.

clayga
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
clayga   6/8/2011 8:35:38 AM
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I was given a clipboard and a coffee-mug coaster made out of gash circuit boards (from a PC motherboard, by the look of it) - creative re-use of material that would otherwise end up in landfill...

pbelearn
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
pbelearn   6/7/2011 5:04:14 AM
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I have occasionally used two sheets of the FR-4 PCB material in the drilled "VERO-board" style, sometimes with a sheet of porous material held in between, when in severe need for some type of air or petrol filter for the race car, on the race track. It stands plenty of heat, while keeping all bad material out of engines. Peter.B

Stargzer
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
Stargzer   6/6/2011 3:46:51 PM
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Ooh,I like that! Before 9/11,every hijacked plane was taken for a joy ride or held hostage to release some criminals, not used as a weapon. Flight 93 proved that the good guys outnumber the bad guys and will take action when needed. I believe that every passenger should be ISSUED a weapon of some sort when boarding to keep the bad guys in check. This might be even better than my personal plan to take two rolls of quarters, a pair of clean socks, and some extra shoe-laces in my next carrry-on. Sic semper terriculamentis!

Duane Benson
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
Duane Benson   6/3/2011 8:49:50 PM
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Heat shrink tubing has a lot of good uses, but I can't think of any non-electronic uses I've come up with the the PCB. Although, I suppose I have used them for decoration. At a company making OCR scanners many years ago, I used them as cubicle decoration. The company went through so many prototype revisions that I, being one of the test and beta people had a stack of useless boards. I found that if I slapped them against my cube wall just right, they'd stick like Velcro.

WKetel
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
WKetel   6/3/2011 7:47:45 PM
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Sme of the better grades of the glass-epoxy board material, with all copper removed, can make a very nice pocket knife that will not trigger any metal detector. The edge is not as good as good carbon steel, but it is as good as some of the cheaper stainless steel imported ones. PLus, they are fairly easy to sharpen. Aside from that, a chunk of the material 0,062 or a bit thicker makes a very good chassis for a radio controlled vehicle, or a small robot. The down side is that the stuff is very hard on saw blades, and you need to be very careful when grinding it.

goldscott
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
goldscott   6/3/2011 7:03:08 PM
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I've used heat shrink around the ends of cables on a bicycle (brakes, derailleurs) to stop the cable from fraying.

no clever name
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
no clever name   6/3/2011 6:56:20 PM
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With the copper all etched off a stack of this about 1/2 inch tall makes a good high load thermal break for themal and load testing load cells. Made good insulators for the frame supporting a improvised 1000 amp@ 10 V resistor using steel strapping as resistance elements and Din rails cut and bent as the frame, stuffed in a big plastic bucket of water. the .1 hole pattern version makes a good dirt keeeper for flowerpots. Much better than gravel or pot shards. emergency replacement for small house door glass (attemped break in repair) Rod

Don.Nowakowski
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
Don.Nowakowski   6/3/2011 6:19:41 PM
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When I worked in telecomm, I was responsible for compliance testing for some telephone central-office equipment. We had already passed the EMI tests, but we failed the flammability test. We found that we could pass the flammability test if we put a barrier, sort of a fire-break, half-way up within the assembly. Metal worked, but we were afraid that the metal would affect our EMI performance. We tried building the barrier out of leftover FR-4. It worked great. We passed the flammability test without affecting the EMI perfomance. Oh yes, after that, we did flammability testing first! - Don

BicycleBill
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re: What else can you do with our ubiquitous PC-board material?
BicycleBill   6/3/2011 6:17:18 PM
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Eric--aren't you concerned about getting tiny glass fibers in your skin? Just like you can get when you handle PCBs by their edges, and the tiny splinters get into your fingertips.....I prefer the bamboo back scratcher you can get at any trade show or conference that has a Mouser Electronics booth--they have been giving them away for years!

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