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Steve Knapp
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re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Steve Knapp   7/19/2011 7:14:48 PM
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Whats the difference from the two FPGA giants? How about standby and low-frequence active power consumption measured in MICROamps not tens of milliamps? How about packaging measuring just a few millimeters square? How about production prices of a few dollars or less?

Steve Knapp
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re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Steve Knapp   7/19/2011 7:09:50 PM
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Actually, SiliconBlue FPGAs also use static memory configuration cells, just like Xilinx and Altera. Consequently, SiliconBlue FPGAs are reprogrammable. SiliconBlue FPGAs also have on-chip and *optional* Nonvolatile Configuration Memory (NVCM). The NVCM provides a low-cost and secure configuration option, essentially providing single-chip integration. You can configure a SiliconBlue FPGA from an SPI Flash, download it from a processor, or use the on-chip NVCM. It's your choice.

genovalente
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re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
genovalente   7/15/2011 6:37:18 PM
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SiBlue is not antifuse; it is a CMOS FPGA with a non-volatile configuration memory section that allow the single package to boot itself. http://www.siliconbluetech.com/technology/NVCM.aspx Nice packaging for mobile OEMs, very low power.. as long as the software works well, they have a really nice niche, I think.

KB3001
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re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
KB3001   7/14/2011 3:14:23 PM
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Are you sure their FPGA technology is one-time programmable?

Patk0317
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re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Patk0317   7/13/2011 8:30:13 PM
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Try to find an Altera or Xilinx device for $1.99. They are all about the high end. This is about the low end. You can sell a goodly number of chips into servers with 60% margins, or a gazillion into cell phones with much lower margins.

Code Monkey
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re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Code Monkey   7/12/2011 6:16:34 PM
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SiBlue's FPGAs are essentially antifuse parts, while Altera and Xilinx are mostly SRAM parts. You can only program an antifuse once, but it's a very efficient way to configure FPGA cells.

GREAT-Terry
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CEO
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
GREAT-Terry   7/12/2011 1:49:15 AM
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I agree the phase "To differentiate, you have to add hardware features to the devices", but how this FPGA be different from the two big giants - Altera and Xilinx? What actually the FPGA help in improving the hardware features? I guess adding more sensors may also sound.



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