Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Steve Knapp
User Rank
Rookie
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Steve Knapp   7/19/2011 7:14:48 PM
NO RATINGS
Whats the difference from the two FPGA giants? How about standby and low-frequence active power consumption measured in MICROamps not tens of milliamps? How about packaging measuring just a few millimeters square? How about production prices of a few dollars or less?

Steve Knapp
User Rank
Rookie
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Steve Knapp   7/19/2011 7:09:50 PM
NO RATINGS
Actually, SiliconBlue FPGAs also use static memory configuration cells, just like Xilinx and Altera. Consequently, SiliconBlue FPGAs are reprogrammable. SiliconBlue FPGAs also have on-chip and *optional* Nonvolatile Configuration Memory (NVCM). The NVCM provides a low-cost and secure configuration option, essentially providing single-chip integration. You can configure a SiliconBlue FPGA from an SPI Flash, download it from a processor, or use the on-chip NVCM. It's your choice.

genovalente
User Rank
Rookie
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
genovalente   7/15/2011 6:37:18 PM
NO RATINGS
SiBlue is not antifuse; it is a CMOS FPGA with a non-volatile configuration memory section that allow the single package to boot itself. http://www.siliconbluetech.com/technology/NVCM.aspx Nice packaging for mobile OEMs, very low power.. as long as the software works well, they have a really nice niche, I think.

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
KB3001   7/14/2011 3:14:23 PM
NO RATINGS
Are you sure their FPGA technology is one-time programmable?

Patk0317
User Rank
CEO
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Patk0317   7/13/2011 8:30:13 PM
NO RATINGS
Try to find an Altera or Xilinx device for $1.99. They are all about the high end. This is about the low end. You can sell a goodly number of chips into servers with 60% margins, or a gazillion into cell phones with much lower margins.

Code Monkey
User Rank
Rookie
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
Code Monkey   7/12/2011 6:16:34 PM
NO RATINGS
SiBlue's FPGAs are essentially antifuse parts, while Altera and Xilinx are mostly SRAM parts. You can only program an antifuse once, but it's a very efficient way to configure FPGA cells.

GREAT-Terry
User Rank
CEO
re: SiliconBlue samples 40-nm FPGAs for tablets
GREAT-Terry   7/12/2011 1:49:15 AM
NO RATINGS
I agree the phase "To differentiate, you have to add hardware features to the devices", but how this FPGA be different from the two big giants - Altera and Xilinx? What actually the FPGA help in improving the hardware features? I guess adding more sensors may also sound.



Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

The Best of the Best Videos on YouTube
Max Maxfield
4 comments
A couple of days ago, my chum Paul was visiting me in my office. He'd wandered over from his cubicle in the next bay to take a brief coffee break. This week, Paul had been admiring the ...

Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock

Jolt Awards: The Best Books
Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock
1 Comment
As we do every year, Dr. Dobb's recognizes the best books of the last 12 months via the Jolt Awards -- our cycle of product awards given out every two months in each of six categories. No ...

Engineering Investigations

Air Conditioner Falls From Window, Still Works
Engineering Investigations
2 comments
It's autumn in New England. The leaves are turning to red, orange, and gold, my roses are in their second bloom, and it's time to remove the air conditioner from the window. On September ...

David Blaza

The Other Tesla
David Blaza
5 comments
I find myself going to Kickstarter and Indiegogo on a regular basis these days because they have become real innovation marketplaces. As far as I'm concerned, this is where a lot of cool ...