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Sanjib.A
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
Sanjib.A   8/28/2011 4:50:46 AM
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I've liked this article as it has answered the same question I had: Why the LED lamps are so costly and I understand, more than electronics, the manufacturers need to do something on the heat management and the casing part to bring down the cost. Like many of my fellow readers, I am also surprised to see the claim of high lifetime with the electrolytic capacitors in it.

antiquus
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
antiquus   8/22/2011 3:27:20 PM
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Do you think the mfg cares about 50k hour lifetimes? A 3k lifetime (1/2 year @100%) would be enough to outlast the thermal-printing on the home depot receipt.

pyeatte
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
pyeatte   8/17/2011 4:40:35 PM
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Until light wiring and distribution is low voltage instead of 120vac, we will have these problems.

VZwanenberg
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
VZwanenberg   8/15/2011 12:39:26 PM
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Hi David, I've several years experience in drivers for LED lamps, and did investigate visible and non-visible flicker. Next link provides my input for Energystar guidelines on LEDlamps and light modulation. http://www.energystar.gov/ia/partners/manuf_res/downloads/lighting/NXP_Semiconductors_Comments.pdf With regards, Victor Zwanenberg

Hube
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
Hube   8/1/2011 7:49:51 PM
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Read my comment, the fist one. ACRICHE is the answer you ask for. Seoul is not the only one maker of these devices. Tree years, 70 lamps always on, no defect, in a few days 2 millions cumuled hours !

Amcfarl
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
Amcfarl   8/1/2011 3:49:58 PM
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Electrolytics are available which survive 12,000 hours at 105C. Unless you are cooking your LED's then you can get extremely long lifetimes and my own patented 900 lumen, 90+lumens/w 60W equivalent dimmable design exceeds 98% efficiency so almost no heat from the driver. And all that with 0.993 PF excellent coliur rendering and NO EMI!

David Ashton
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
David Ashton   7/31/2011 11:15:35 AM
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Good idea - there are CFL fittings that work like this, the 2-pin lamp has the tube and the starter and the ballast is separate. There are also 4-pin types for electronic ballasts. So same idea should be good with LEDs - and reduce the ongoing cost a bit maybe.

MVSEENAN
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
MVSEENAN   7/31/2011 7:57:11 AM
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Hi I am from India and developed LED lamp that works out from the regular incandecent bulb sockets.All led bulbs require Electronics to step down the voltage as they work on 3.3 to 4 volts only.As the current requirements are more heat will be developed and cannot be avoided.The led may last more but the electronics is bound to fail soon than claimed.

chris.michael
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
chris.michael   7/28/2011 11:30:02 PM
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Those would be directly emmitting diodes then. These diodes shine onto phosphors to make white light. The phosphors continue to glow for brief period after the diode stops emmiting and might be able to mask the flicker. We ran into a problem with white LEDs on a system that was trying to blink at a 50% duty cycle only to have the phosphor glow distort it.

David Ashton
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re: A19 LED bulbs: What’s under the frosting?
David Ashton   7/28/2011 4:07:29 AM
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I guess Incandescents have a good bit of thermal inertia and don't dim much if at all in between half cycles. TV's would also have a bit of persistence on the phosphor...and CFLs also usually have an electrolytic in them. Whereas LEDs would definitely be on-off devices. Memo to self...when studying engineering textbooks, do not move head.... ;-)

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