Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
kdboyce
User Rank
Rookie
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
kdboyce   9/30/2011 4:37:41 AM
NO RATINGS
Steve, I started my career at Lockheed Missiles and Space and my job was satellite payload analysis as well as failure modes and recovery methods to ensure getting the data back. It was less 'formal' (if I can use that word) than methods available today, but was nonetheless meticulous and involved knowing every circuit, its function, how it could fail, and what that failure would do to the rest of the systems. Good for anyone who later in their career had to debug of any type of system. Keep up the good work!

Robotics Developer
User Rank
Rookie
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
Robotics Developer   9/28/2011 11:03:10 PM
NO RATINGS
Again, a great series of articles! I remember trying to debug 15x15in pcbs in an array processor prototype with suspect boards on 15" extender boards. When running at full speed sometimes it would not work (had to run 1/2 clock speed - really glad we had designed in that!). Debug of completed systems is always a challenge but more so with compact systems!

jayshukl1121
User Rank
Rookie
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
jayshukl1121   9/28/2011 3:20:55 PM
NO RATINGS
This has been a great read. Thank you. Jigish Shukla www.knownfo.com

Sanjib.A
User Rank
CEO
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
Sanjib.A   9/27/2011 5:48:44 PM
NO RATINGS
Steve, thank you! I agree.

Steve Bible
User Rank
Blogger
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
Steve Bible   9/26/2011 5:32:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Sanjib, I would say that we did not use these formal methods. Thinking about them, these too should be a lesson learned. It takes someone on the team with this kind of knowledge to help lead a volunteer team. Thanks for the suggestion!

Sanjib.A
User Rank
CEO
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
Sanjib.A   9/25/2011 6:22:10 AM
NO RATINGS
HI Steve, thank you for sharing the article! It gives me a deeper knowledge on ARISSat-1's power system. I saw the information about the failure modes of the battery you are talking about. Have you also used any of the traditional failure analysis tools such as FMEA, Fault Tree Analysis to organize the actions required to build the recovery mechanism for different probable failure modes for all the sub-systems?

Steve Bible
User Rank
Blogger
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
Steve Bible   9/25/2011 1:33:19 AM
NO RATINGS
Hi Sanjib, We did think about failure modes and how to recover from them. Tony Monteiro (AA2TX) wrote about the power system in the Jan/Feb 2011 issue of The AMSAT Journal. In the article he describes the failure modes of the battery. The article is available at http://tinyurl.com/3f72xvy.

Sanjib.A
User Rank
CEO
re: Chips in Space: Lessons learned (Part 2)
Sanjib.A   9/24/2011 2:19:13 PM
NO RATINGS
Hi Steve, just curious to know ... did you do some kind of failure modes and effect analysis (FMEA) at the beginning of the design phase of the project? Were the modes of battery failures not considered? Anyways, I think now it becomes part of integrated knowledge base to avoid such possibilities in future. All the best for next one! :)



Flash Poll
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
The Engineering Life - Around the Web
Terry Cutler, CTO, Digital Locksmiths

The USB Keys in the Urinal
Terry Cutler, CTO, Digital Locksmiths
Post a comment
Security is a major obsession today, particularly as the industry makes the shift from traditional, standalone devices to the design of connected, networked systems that are “always ...

Engineer's Bookshelf
Caleb Kraft

The Martian: A Delightful Exploration of Math, Mars & Feces
Caleb Kraft
6 comments
To say that Andy Weir's The Martian is an exploration of math, Mars, and feces is a slight simplification. I doubt that the author would have any complaints, though.

Design Contests & Competitions
Caleb Kraft

Join The Balancing Act With April's Caption Contest
Caleb Kraft
58 comments
Sometimes it can feel like you're really performing in the big tent when presenting your hardware. This month's caption contest exemplifies this wonderfully.

Engineering Investigations
Caleb Kraft

Frankenstein's Fix: The Winners Announced!
Caleb Kraft
8 comments
The Frankenstein's Fix contest for the Tektronix Scope has finally officially come to an end. We had an incredibly amusing live chat earlier today to announce the winners. However, we ...

Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)