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Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Max The Magnificent   10/6/2011 1:31:24 PM
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Your comment reminded me of a game called "Mugwumps" ... we should do a column about those old games :-)

Max123
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Max123   10/6/2011 1:29:24 PM
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Brought back memories of the character based "rogue" game I used to play..

ost0
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
ost0   10/6/2011 7:08:13 AM
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That paper type I believe is called tractor-feed, and it appears you can still buy it (like on http://www.highsecuritypaper.com/home-office-continuous.html). Not long time ago I have seen companies using this paper type with two layers and carbon in between for and dot matrix printer to get a carbon copy. Ascii art also lives on as you can see if you google it. I believe I have some strips of punched tape with 7bit ascii art stacked away, with some nude ladies on ;)

Max The Magnificent
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Max The Magnificent   10/4/2011 9:22:37 PM
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Thanks for this link -- I just added a copy of this image into the article -- Max

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
David Ashton   10/4/2011 9:19:19 PM
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Texas Instruments produced a dot matrix printer, the TI810, that looked a bit like that (minus the keyboard). Built like a tank, and ultra-reliable. They were favourites in the Airline industry as ticket printers, they could print an 8-ply ticket and the bottom copy would be quite readable. The tickets were fan-fold as well, and loaded from the bottom. They don't build stuff like that these days...

Wnderer
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
Wnderer   10/4/2011 9:09:58 PM
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I was taught Basic in high school on one of these. http://www.columbia.edu/cu/computinghistory/la36.html

KarlS
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
KarlS   10/4/2011 8:19:55 PM
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Sorry, hit the wrong key-- logic was hand drawn and signal and power wires connections were on punched cards with wiring lists used for build (hand soldered) and engineering changes.

KarlS
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
KarlS   10/4/2011 8:16:17 PM
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The first Automated Logic Diagrams (ALDS) that I worked with in 1963 were printed on the IBM 1403 line printer. It was a chain printer and a special chain was used that had a few "graphics" characters used for line drawing. Yes, the regular fan fold paper was 132 characters wide, but the ALD paper was fed edgewise to allow wider diagrams. Circuit technology was nand, 2 or 3 inputs per module with modules packaged on printed circuit cards that plugged into boards mounted on gates in frames. Engineers drew diagrams and keypunch transcribers keyed card p/n and physical and page location onto punched cards that were inputted into the EDA computer system. Previously the AN/FSQ7/8

David Ashton
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
David Ashton   10/4/2011 7:47:08 PM
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Aah, memories... In 1980 I was working as a techie at the University of Zimbabwe. One of the perks was that we could take courses, so I took a Fortran course. Think walking over to the computer centre (no remote terminals) with punched cards, and collecting your results on the above fan fold paper. As a side project (not altogether authorised) I tried to do a Biorhythms program. Biorhythms was all the rage at the time and held that everyone had three cycles (physical, emotional and intellectual) of different lengths, that started on the day you were born. (See Wikipedia for more.) Anyway, I made a Fortran program that calculated the cycles for a month and printed them out in chart fashion as sine waves of Ps, Es and Is across the page. It looked pretty good. But on one iteration of my program I left a loop open and when I went to collect my printout - usually a couple of pages - I was presented with about three inches of fan fold paper and called into the computer centre manager's office. After an embarrasing interview I promised to curb my out-of-course programming activities. I corrected the error and sneaked it through a couple more times, and I did learn a lot about programming, but I've always thought that Biorhythms were a load of rubbish....

BrianBailey
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re: How it was: Fan-fold paper and ASCII art
BrianBailey   10/4/2011 4:09:22 PM
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I remember one friend who worked on printer development. They were at the very beginning of laser printing technology, but on fan fold paper. They were just doing their first test of the first printer they built. From what he said, this thing was pretty humongous! They loaded the paper in and turned it on. They had a slight technical glitch when the printer decided that it needed to feed a few sheets through the printer. It fed them so fast the flew through the air and managed to cut the ceiling tiles - you know those drop down ceiling tiles. It had demolished a good part of their ceiling before someone managed to turn the thing off.

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