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chia1cdef
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re: Thank you, Mr. Jobs
chia1cdef   10/7/2011 10:27:13 AM
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Jobs has transformed technology products from cold face to a warm face. He puts life to products and make people fall in love with them. No CEO has done a job as successful as Jobs. It really a job well done.

Jeff.Petro
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re: Thank you, Mr. Jobs
Jeff.Petro   10/7/2011 6:06:31 AM
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Many times I looked at apple products and categorized them as average products with a shiny exterior. I never understood what the attraction was as I was never fooled by the pomp and pagentry. After many years of watching rapid fanboys, I began to understand his true genius which was his marketting prowess. The products were no more innovative than his competitors but he had the charisma to make you believe they were ... legions of followers would hang on his every word as if he had invented life itself. That was his true gift that made apple what it is. Only time will tell whether the company will survive long after his death. He was just as much an icon as the apple logo is and his passing can be likened to a limb being cut off. You'll survive but you no longer have the same capacity to perform.

chipmonk0
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Manager
re: Thank you, Mr. Jobs
chipmonk0   10/6/2011 10:23:56 PM
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Steve Jobs looked up to John Lennon and tried to live up to that creative standard. Last year when we met to talk transistors & chips I told him he had come pretty close to our common hero.

Bert22306
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CEO
re: Thank you, Mr. Jobs
Bert22306   10/6/2011 10:03:39 PM
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Isn't it interesting how both Steve Jobs and Bill Gates are college dropouts? I did notice that Apple products are not actually leading edge, in technical terms. But they are so cleverly designed that they create a fashion trend all on their own. And a cult following. That's one aspect of his genius. It's hard to deny that this one CEO was definitely worth whatever he made. The other aspect of his genius was in creating this vertical organization, in which hardware, software, and services are all walled in. While I'll freely admit that ain't my cup of tea at all, Steve managed to make that appealing to mllions of people all over the world. It's impossible to argue with that kind of success, whether it was my cup of tea or not.

ANON1255185289979
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Rookie
re: Thank you, Mr. Jobs
ANON1255185289979   10/6/2011 8:39:57 PM
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I met Jobs a couple times. First in 1977 when I took our touch screen/pad invention to his storefront plant. I saw him again in 1979 when his success was beginning to show. In 1977 he showed special concern for his customers which was very unlike all the other nerds making PC's at the time (Apple was hardly the first or best). He was also a real know it all, who at that point in time felt that graphics and the GUI were not important to the PC world. We were selling GUI and pointing device things so that was the last business visit I ever had directly with Jobs. What surprised me about Jobs was that after three decades he had not become completely bored with this stuff and sought to get a life. For the latter reason I really feel sorry for him. I guess he convinced himself in trying other things that product management was the only thing he really excelled at. Perhaps he left notes or a memoir for us, which can set me straight on this issue. Oh yeah I forgot Steve also "mentored" Schmuckburger at FaceBook or so the Schmuck has gone on the TV News to tell us.

bdelaneyca
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Rookie
re: Thank you, Mr. Jobs
bdelaneyca   10/6/2011 8:21:24 PM
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I worked closely with Steve from 1978 - 1983, while employed at Regis McKenna Inc. and at Chiat-Day Advertising. Steve was difficult to stay up with, intellectually and physically. His brain work fast and he has so many great thoughts, you could not retain everything. BUT, even back in 1981, he had hid doubts. An example of this, is when three of us were standing in their shipping and receiving area in Cupertino (Bandley One). Steve looked at me and said..."do you think we'll ever fill this place up?" I simply responded with. . . "I hope so." As I look back on that moment, I realize how human Steve was. He used to say that he "wanted computers to be as easy to use as a telephone." That was in 1981-1982. As it turns out, he did that. He accomplished that goal. It has been written, "death ends a life, but it doesn't end a relationship." May our relationship with Steve last until we too, venture to the large "skunks work" in the sky, and view what he is developing. God bless everyone who is from Silicon Valley.

Joseph.Schachner
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Rookie
re: Thank you, Mr. Jobs
Joseph.Schachner   10/6/2011 8:06:22 PM
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Mr. Jobs was not a high school drop out. He dropped out of his first year of college. See the transcript of the speech he made at Stanford U. several years ago.

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