Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 7   >   >>
TFCSD
User Rank
CEO
re: The hiring problem
TFCSD   12/3/2011 4:33:35 AM
NO RATINGS
I think companies are mainly window shopping for that FOA employee. It boils down to if companies are losing more money by not having an employee sitting in an empty chair, they will quickly find someone.

eafpres1
User Rank
Rookie
re: The hiring problem
eafpres1   11/24/2011 5:16:55 AM
NO RATINGS
My previous company didn't train, didn't mentor, and most of the time hired every position "ad-hoc", meaning the specifications were made up on the fly according to the tastes and perceived needs of the hiring manager. Professionals within the company either became entrenched, or for the unfortunate ones identified as high-potential, they were put on an "up or out" path. Ironically, the result was to drive out many talented key persons, create a hiring gap, and gut the company of badly needed skills. A paradigm shift is required in most companies to have a multi-faceted pipeline of talent--develop talent within, without creating unnecessary career risk for those willing to try new challenges, link with universities & other talent sources and develop new hires from interns at least two years before graduation, and apply what seems oxymoronic--a standardized but flexible hiring and careeer path approach. The latter consists of standard job descriptions and grades, and professionals are hired into the path and grade based on their merits, and then take on particular tasks and grow within the company; those that do well advance to higher grades, those that don't either plateau out, exit, or move to another path. The all or nothing paradigm most companies are in is hurting US innovation and competitiveness.

Wade2
User Rank
Rookie
re: The hiring problem
Wade2   11/14/2011 6:19:24 AM
NO RATINGS
Geeze, you should see the resumes and interviews we get. And, it isn't because of the pay. I've seen the other side of this. And, it's no wonder companies just give up and contract to "other countries". You know how you want to sell you car on craigslist, but you end up giving it to the dealer on a trade in, just because you don't want to deal with all SPAM you'll get. It's a pretty good analogy to the problem. It's not like you get a CarFax on a potential employee. :)

Karl P.E.
User Rank
Rookie
re: The hiring problem
Karl P.E.   11/6/2011 11:54:03 PM
NO RATINGS
If you want a prime example of "Do as I say, not as I do," ask NASA why they will not hire anyone in civil servant engineering positions with more than three years experience. ANSWER: Over 50% of their (CS) engineering workers are eligible for full retirement in the next five years. They hire freshouts whom they can train for the next five years. What about the subcontractors who are already performing those jobs? They're too old. Shouldn't NASA management have been thinking about that problem ten years earlier? How many other government technical agencies operate the same way in blatant violation of the law?

wb0bnr
User Rank
Rookie
re: The hiring problem
wb0bnr   11/6/2011 12:11:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Another aspect of all this hiring controversy is the $25K H.R. types who haven't a clue about resume's that use common acronyms specific to an industry that have 2 or 3 variances. A Bachelor's degree doesn't guarantee competence just as an Associate's along with advanced basket weaving doesn't ensure a "rounded" individual. I've worked with a Master's degree fellow who couldn't wire an A.C. plug.

nosubject
User Rank
Rookie
re: The hiring problem
nosubject   11/5/2011 6:05:14 PM
NO RATINGS
Misleading. The fact is the companies are not really hiring, but they have to express the idea in a political correct way. As a company, if you say "we don't need to hire". The bad guy is the company. The meaning is the company is not growing, and might have a bad future. But if you word that as "we have a lot of openings, but we cannot find the qualified person to fill". The bad guy is those who are looking for job. And the hint is the company is still growing.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: The hiring problem
old account Frank Eory   11/4/2011 9:27:30 PM
NO RATINGS
Wasn't $50k roughly the starting salary for fresh EE grads with no experience back in the late 90s?

mcgrathdylan
User Rank
Blogger
re: The hiring problem
mcgrathdylan   11/4/2011 6:08:17 PM
NO RATINGS
Very interesting, Frank. I had not heard about this purple squirrel before, but it sounds like a real problem. And I can totally see it happening.

UnderemployedGeek
User Rank
Rookie
re: The hiring problem
UnderemployedGeek   11/4/2011 5:21:14 AM
NO RATINGS
I turned down $50k a year offer from a Chinese company in Eugene, OR abour a year ago. I also turned down a $40 an hr. contract from in**l recently. My min. is $50 an hr. Many pay that here.

seaEE
User Rank
CEO
re: The hiring problem
seaEE   11/2/2011 4:49:00 AM
NO RATINGS
It would be interesting to see the actual data on this. How many jobs are actually turned down by engineers because the wage is too low? Maybe it would make a good eetimes poll. Have you, the reader, ever turned down a position when unemployed, a position that was on parity skillset-wise with your former position, due to the wages offered being too low?

Page 1 / 7   >   >>


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Vetinari Clock: Decisions, Decisions, Decisions …
Max Maxfield
27 comments
Things are bouncing merrily along with regard to my uber-cool Vetinari Clock project. The wooden cabinet is being handcrafted by my chum Bob (a master carpenter) using an amazing ...

Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock

Jolt Awards: The Best Books
Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock
1 Comment
As we do every year, Dr. Dobb's recognizes the best books of the last 12 months via the Jolt Awards -- our cycle of product awards given out every two months in each of six categories. No ...

Engineering Investigations

Air Conditioner Falls From Window, Still Works
Engineering Investigations
2 comments
It's autumn in New England. The leaves are turning to red, orange, and gold, my roses are in their second bloom, and it's time to remove the air conditioner from the window. On September ...

David Blaza

The Other Tesla
David Blaza
5 comments
I find myself going to Kickstarter and Indiegogo on a regular basis these days because they have become real innovation marketplaces. As far as I'm concerned, this is where a lot of cool ...