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mjohns
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
mjohns   12/19/2012 4:38:30 AM
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No Program counter just means the next location to execute does not default to P+1. The current micro-location is known and can be pushed on a stack with a "subroutine return" address bit flipped to create a return address when the subroutine returns. Many Prime Computers used the same tactic in their firmware next address units. Requires good software to allocate the firmware efficiently. Can't have two subroutine calls in a row without additional creativity unless you want to ping-pong forever.

Bob Lacovara
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
Bob Lacovara   11/3/2011 3:31:07 PM
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You know, a decade or so back there was a phenomena of naming every one-researcher lab a "Center of Excellence" in this, that or the other thing. As though anyone ever started a "Center of Good Enough" or "Center of Mediocrity". This trend seems to have diminished. Thank heavens: many of these Centers weren't much more than a letterhead.

Bob Lacovara
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
Bob Lacovara   11/3/2011 3:29:08 PM
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Precisely... if you are going to take up real estate with wide busses, then you may as well get everything you can for it. And that's more than addressing, branching, vector fields, and so on. There's only time, and space... if we are pushing the timing limits at the moment, then we can push out the space envelope as well.

Mechatism
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
Mechatism   11/3/2011 8:07:49 AM
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128 bits isn't all about memmory addressing. Many fields like Cryptography and GPS can certainly benefit from wider registers, particularly a true 128 bit, quad precision floating point capability. But simple, everyday operations can also benefit as well. High clock rates and multiple cores aren't the only roads to performance increases. Just think about string matching 16 bytes at a time!

agk
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
agk   11/3/2011 8:04:43 AM
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Now the kind of applications are expanding fast ,sure to go for 64 bit architectures. ARM is also doing so and many product applications will be benifited.

KB3001
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
KB3001   11/1/2011 1:48:06 PM
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Do not bet on it. Those FPGA companies are very incremental in their developments :-)

KB3001
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
KB3001   11/1/2011 1:45:31 PM
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It was only a matter of time before ARM announced this. Unless they mess things up monumentally, the future is theirs in the server market IMO.

Bob Lacovara
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
Bob Lacovara   11/1/2011 12:44:47 PM
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In addition to SIMD and vector operations, a wider instruction word allows you to build-in hardware n-way branches, where n might be 4 to 256. The wider word, ultimately, allows you to trade off space for time.

zhgreader
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
zhgreader   11/1/2011 11:42:30 AM
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what on earth different is 64b from 32b?

cdhmanning
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re: ARM unveils 64-bit architecture
cdhmanning   10/31/2011 11:29:10 PM
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Why do you want 128-bit address widths? 32 bits only gives you 4Gbytes which is too small for servers. 64-bits gives you 1.8x10^19 bytes. That's more than 2Gbytes for every person on the planet and is probably more than is needed to address all the RAM in existence. It is going to be a long time before we need a bigger address bus and it certainly is not worth the overhead for the foreseeable future.

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