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peralta_mike
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
peralta_mike   11/8/2011 1:54:32 PM
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We should take a lesson from the real world. There are about 3 supervisor for every worker. The supervisors fight amongst each other (this is where all the parallelism happens) to see how much of the worker's time they can get. So we need 3 cores for every "working core" - that actually does the non-parallel task. In this way there are no conflicts within the "working core" which does all the actual work. The other 3 cores are just used to sort out all the parallelism.

jackOfManyTrades
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
jackOfManyTrades   11/8/2011 8:15:32 AM
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I think it would have been better called: "Five quotes on parallel programming". The second five are a bit weak.

Sheetal.Pandey
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
Sheetal.Pandey   11/8/2011 7:27:35 AM
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i like this "My hypothesis is that we can solve [the software crisis in parallel computing], but only if we work from the algorithm down to the hardware -- not the traditional hardware first mentality." Tim Mattson, principal engineer at Intel.

Eric Verhulst_Altreonic
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
Eric Verhulst_Altreonic   11/7/2011 8:47:24 PM
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Parallel processing is not that difficult. Software is modelling and the world is concurrent by nature. But what is difficult is to undo the brainswashing of a sloppy education in software engineering that starts bottom up (from the hardware to the software: I call that the von Neumann syndrome), hence the two conflicting quotes from Tim Mattson, Intel. We have a concurrent programming model that covers for a single multi-tasking processor to a networked system with (theoretically millions of nodes, even heterogeneous) in just 5 KB per node. Difficult? No, because it is based on a formal development and borrows from CSP (the Communicating Sequential Processes process algebra of Hoare). It's actually very natural. But where do they still teach CSP?

rogerrobie68
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
rogerrobie68   11/7/2011 5:54:42 PM
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Those are even better

KB3001
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
KB3001   11/7/2011 4:11:11 PM
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"Everybody who learns concurrency thinks they understand it, ends up finding mysterious races they thought weren’t possible, and discovers that they didn’t actually understand it yet after all." Sums up my experience. You get better at it with time but there is no room for complacency!

Marco Jacobs
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
Marco Jacobs   11/7/2011 12:26:06 PM
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Peter: thanks for re-publishing the quotes and the credit. @bah: Sorry for the typo, we'll correct.

Peter Clarke
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
Peter Clarke   11/7/2011 10:10:45 AM
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@bah Thanks, correction made

bah
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
bah   11/7/2011 3:56:39 AM
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Sutter, not Suttler.

cdhmanning
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re: Ten quotes on parallel programming
cdhmanning   11/6/2011 12:32:52 AM
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I think parallel processing is a bit different to multi-tasking. The purpose of multi-tasking is to simultaneously enable multiple independent tasks so that they can proceed on one computer. There is a need to protect shared resources etc. Parallel processing takes a single task and tries to break it into smaller tasks to exploit multiple processors. As an example, consider the difference in the way make can work. Multi-tasking allows two seperate makes to progress in parallel building two projects. Multi-processing allows multiple threads within the building of a single project to allow that build to proceed faster. Design for multi-processing is completely different than for multi-tasking.

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