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colin.holland
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
colin.holland   11/7/2011 2:24:40 PM
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The UK's Radio Society of Great Britain is currently carrying out extensive discussions on its future. http://www.rsgb.org/ The aim is to create the sort of RSGB that is not only relevant to current members, but also attractive to new ones.

kdboyce
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
kdboyce   11/7/2011 5:26:33 PM
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I hope the RSGB is successful in its efforts. As someone coming back to the hobby, I find the equipment, and operating options to be much greater than when I was first licensed in 1956. The wide range repeater options and capabilities on 144MHz and 440MHz are mind boggling. So I am having to learn yet again. Ken - W8VMM

antiquus
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
antiquus   11/7/2011 8:14:21 PM
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Within the last year or so, DHS has quietly forced amateur repeaters off of commercial television towers, on the premise that commercial TV is important for "public emergency" communication, and is therefore a strategic asset with controlled access to the facilities. The result is, of course, that hams (who are the real tactical emergency communications asset) have been forced to relocated their repeaters to less desirable and often less effective locations. Yeah, I feel safer already. I hope someone soon compares the federal attitude towards hams on a "then and now" basis.

Navelpluis
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
Navelpluis   11/9/2011 9:36:48 AM
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Everyone involved in some kind of HAM radio knows the enormous spectrum of all technologies involved in our spare time hours. From antenna to RF amplifier design, from mixer input stages to GHz dishes. And even more: Restoring WW-II equipment and even collect and restore clandestine transceivers and crypto equipment as on www.cryptomuseum.com Have fun !!

Edward Thermals
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
Edward Thermals   11/9/2011 1:47:13 PM
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Most of us "RF" types grew up fascinated with 2-way radio, and electronic circuits. This is our passion and what we are. Today I see younger technical types only interested in showing others how to surf the internet. Even when I meet some of today’s younger hams, they are mostly going to buy something “off the shelf”, rather than build. We find tomorrow’s experienced two-way types will mainly come from the military. Ed.

JohnnnS
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
JohnnnS   11/9/2011 1:56:30 PM
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Look, we all know the ham radio has devolved as a way to attract young people into electronic technology. That path has been killed. It is no more. We should stop lamenting this and just accept that ham radio is a niche hobby that will always be popular with a few souls who enjoy all the varied aspects of the hobby. Besides, I doubt we need a whole bunch of new RF designers banging on the doors of companies not looking to hire.

Jim Stockton
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
Jim Stockton   11/9/2011 2:15:06 PM
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I grew up converting WW2 Command Radios for amateur use, then building transmitters out of TV sweep tubes. It was a great learning experience. Most Hams today are appliance operators or CBers with better bandwidth and power. The experimenters are few and far between. The thought of 300GHz and above is daunting as Si probably doesn't have enough electron mobility. Will be interesting to see what could come from the experimenters in the future.

Texassignaltech
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
Texassignaltech   11/9/2011 3:08:37 PM
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While it is true that fewer of the younger generation is joining the ranks of the amateur radio community, that path has certainly not been killed. Those in positions of leadership and regulation have had to implement changes (good and bad) in order to keep our great hobby alive. To us it is much more than a hobby. Many discoveries, inventions and patents were founded by experimentation thru ham radio, including the proven viability of the VHF/UHF spectrum. I am confident that amateur radio will continue to spark interest in young and old alike, as long as we show them the way. David Pollard, N5IT, USN Retired

Earl54
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
Earl54   11/9/2011 3:36:36 PM
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Well, let's see. About the comment of RF designers. The article mentions software defined radio, as well as numerous digital modes. Sounds like a lot of digital and software design, not necessarily all RF. In fact, the hobby can encompass just about any electronic or computer related engineering. Even mechanical, if you build your own enclosures. As for the niche, yes, it is a niche hobby, always has been. But that niche serves a purpose, and that is emergency communication. You may pooh pooh that idea with cell phones and the internet, but my fiber to the curb connection went down went the power went off in the April tornados. The cell phone also became virtually unusable, as the cells remaining after the tornados went through were quickly overloaded. Guess what "hobby" was helping with the emergency communication?

masher
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re: Ham radio in the 21st century
masher   11/9/2011 4:43:42 PM
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The appliance operator comments and the SDR comments basically theorizing that RF skills will be left in the dust is not entirely true, and it doesn't have to, engineering and ham radio are about learning and modifying your skills to fit new technologies. Since I'm an RF power amp designer I doubt that SDR radios will ever make my power amp designs go by the wayside but certainly the dedicated receiver designers will need to upgrade their skills. It all depends on what you want to do with ham radio and like the author says finding the time to do your projects is a big show stopper at times. I just put together a 900 MHz to 10 meter FM repeater/remote base and since I wanted something more than a vertical antenna I went overboard and built a small yagi antenna. Now I need to find a way to turn the yagi antenna via the 900 Mhz side, here comes the programming part of this boondoggle of mine. I am now refreshing my C skills to make a rotator controller that works via DTMF commands. In one week I have worked every continent on HF FM, built a repeater with a HF remote base, a controller to send the remote ID an antenna to reach further, re-built 2 power supplies and am now at the C programming end of things to steer my antenna. I'll probably elect the help of one of our new codeless tech hams at work for the guidance on the C part of things. In the process this young engineer will learn a lot of RF while I'll get some code refresher skills and as I'm sure you all know, these projects are constantly evolving so this is just the biginning. Lets see maybe the next project will be an FPGA remote base, we have another codeless tech ham at work who is an FPGA guru and he needs to get back into ham radio. Catch you on 10 FM some day if I can get the antenna rotator controller working. Mike WB8VLC/7

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