Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 11   >   >>
David1975
User Rank
Rookie
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
David1975   11/16/2011 2:55:45 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree 100%. We have a Samsung 50-inch DLP TV. It's about 5 years old and it works great. Back then, DLP was a much better value than LCD. Of course, when the DLP breaks we will probably replace it with an LCD or something similar.

LiketoBike
User Rank
CEO
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
LiketoBike   11/16/2011 2:38:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting discussions about the definition of "turkey." I agree that some of these were not turkeys per se when them came out. And how much of this is hindsight? * Some were out-and-out turkeys :-) * Some worked but were overtaken by competitors in short order - temporal turkeys? Cloudy crystal ball? * Some were not technical turkeys, but were financial turkeys (cost too much or charged too much) * Some were not technical turkeys but were "feature" turkeys (the customer really did not want that functionality) * Turkeys of another "feather" that I have missed

LiketoBike
User Rank
CEO
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
LiketoBike   11/16/2011 2:34:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Absolutely agree here. I tried a couple of demos in the stores the last month. Can't even remember the names...but one was tolerable for 5 minutes, then gave me a headache. Another had glasses/visor that was too heavy, and gave me a headache right away. Viewing stereo photographs does not hurt my head THAT much... So I rate them as not ready for prime time yet.

krwada
User Rank
Rookie
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
krwada   11/15/2011 11:53:30 PM
NO RATINGS
All of the technologies mentioned here actually had some promise when they 1st came out. I think the biggest turkey I have ever encountered was Digital Research's MPM. Actually, Gary Kildall's CPM fared much better ... till IBM and Bill Gates came along with DOS no?

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
Duane Benson   11/15/2011 11:11:21 PM
NO RATINGS
"CueCat" - I've been trying to remember that name. It's funny how some of these turkeys come back around a second, third or fourth time and sometimes actually catch on. QR codes have essentially the same purpose as the CueCat codes, but QR codes don't require a custom reader that's tethered to a desktop PC. The thin client PC or disk-less workstation has shown up and died numerous times. It may actually have a chance in its next incarnation with all of the online applications available now. Maybe. Maybe not. Sometimes what is one generation's turkey is just before its time.

Bob Lacovara
User Rank
Rookie
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
Bob Lacovara   11/15/2011 8:40:40 PM
NO RATINGS
tomkinsr, your point is well taken. None of the "turkeys" mentioned here were designed and marketed by total morons looking for a fast buck. (Well, at least they weren't morons.) Products rise or fall for reasons sometimes obscure, and sometimes obvious. Obvious in hindsight, that is. There are very few products out there that were released with truly foreseeable and disastrous flaws. A few, but not many. To label some of these products "turkeys" is a disservice to the designers and companies that brought them out.

Bob Lacovara
User Rank
Rookie
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
Bob Lacovara   11/15/2011 8:33:54 PM
NO RATINGS
Bert, the method used in VHS to record hifi stereo was a wavelength-driven recording layer. Audio was laid down in a fairly thick layer (thick due to wavelength) in the tape. Then the video was recorded on top, but didn't penetrate the thickness of the tape. So you had both audio and video, one above the other. Trouble was playback. The heads for audio and video were separate, and as a result, tapes didn't always interchange between machines. You could get good tracking of video, or audio, but not both. Sony's hifi stereo was part of a single rf feed to the heads. Also, the cassettes were more compact and robust than VHS. For years afterwards, professional news gathering was done on the Beta format... not VHS. Beta failed because it cost a few bucks more than VHS, and the public doesn't want technical superiority when viewing copies of Sex in the City. They want cheap.

ken a
User Rank
Rookie
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
ken a   11/15/2011 8:28:59 PM
NO RATINGS
CueCat.

Karl P.E.
User Rank
Rookie
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
Karl P.E.   11/15/2011 7:43:13 PM
NO RATINGS
Within the Bell System ISDN stood for "I still don't know" as the answer to the question "What is the reason for using ISDN?"

RB3200
User Rank
Freelancer
re: The biggest product turkeys of all time
RB3200   11/15/2011 4:23:19 PM
NO RATINGS
Another historic example from the same time period as Sony's MiniDisc is Philips's DCC (Digital Compact Cassette).

<<   <   Page 3 / 11   >   >>


Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
<b><a href=Betajet">

The Circle – The Future's Imperfect in the Present Tense
Betajet
5 comments
The Circle, a satirical, dystopian novel published in 2013 by San Francisco-based writer Dave Eggers, is about a large, very powerful technology company that combines aspects of Google, ...

Max Maxfield

Recommended Reads From the Engineer's Bookshelf
Max Maxfield
27 comments
I'm not sure if I read more than most folks or not, but I do I know that I spend quite a lot of time reading. I hate to be idle, so I always have a book or two somewhere about my person -- ...

Martin Rowe

Make This Engineering Museum a Reality
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
Vincent Valentine is a man on a mission. He wants to make the first house to ever have a telephone into a telephone museum. Without help, it may not happen.

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...