Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Bert22306
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
Bert22306   11/30/2011 9:58:43 PM
NO RATINGS
Depends on the user. A user who has exacting requirements will have the better experience if he can make the tablet do exactly what he wants. A user who has no special requirements is better off conforming to what someone else thought up. Imagine how useless a PC would be, if it could only do what someone else's "app" was designed to do. Hackability defintely puts me in the Android camp.

GoStripes
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
GoStripes   11/29/2011 10:37:09 PM
NO RATINGS
Its not really removed, if your device doesn't conform to the specs for the OS version Google won't let you have their apps (their apps are closed sourced and copyrighted and not part of Android). If the Fire is using Android 2.2 for instance it must have bluetooth and GPS to name two things (why? Because that's the rule the made back then, and they are not going to go back and change it now)

GoStripes
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
GoStripes   11/29/2011 10:34:48 PM
NO RATINGS
No Google should just continue doing what they are doing now. Device which don't comply with certain rules don't get access to the Google apps (which have never been open source and never will be) - you get a certain assurance of hardware quality if you get a device which has the Google market on it. This would disappear if they allowed any Android device (Hey, I've compiled Android for my toothbrush!) got the market. normal people who don't hack or root won't really care. The tiny minority of nerds who do care can do it, and it just adds to the saleability

Patk0317
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
Patk0317   11/29/2011 10:20:08 PM
NO RATINGS
The whole purpose of Android is open system - the antithesis of iPad iOS - supposedly totally closed. Eventually (if not already) there will be more Android devices out there than iOS, but who will have the better end to end user experience? And will that matter more than an open system?

wilber_xbox
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
wilber_xbox   11/29/2011 5:36:02 PM
NO RATINGS
if in the end someone would hack the system as the company has provide the source code then why not company itself provide these basic facilities which make device more appealing....don't understand the logic behind such things.

p_g
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
p_g   11/29/2011 3:58:37 PM
NO RATINGS
This is not a Android hack, its adding android market back which was removed as part of customization by Amazon. And I feel allowing customization is the most attractive feature of Android where each seller can create its own market. I think in this case its threat to Amazon and not to Google. Amazon lost the control over market place.

Dave.Dykstra
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
Dave.Dykstra   11/29/2011 5:36:13 AM
NO RATINGS
Well, my perception was that Android was already either out of control, or on the verge of being so. As Sylvie points out, the hackability makes it very attractive to hackers.

GREATTerry
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
GREATTerry   11/29/2011 5:24:35 AM
NO RATINGS
The risk is that finally the Android will be out of control, like what we face now with the instability of the ever-blaming MS Windows.

SylvieBarak
User Rank
Blogger
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
SylvieBarak   11/29/2011 3:46:04 AM
NO RATINGS
I think its hackability is Android's whole appeal, really.... take that away and it's not a particularly enticing OS!

chanj0
User Rank
Author
re: Android market hack for Kindle Fire
chanj0   11/29/2011 2:43:21 AM
NO RATINGS
Shall Google stop Android being hacked? Or shall they embrace the hacked hardware, allowing the users to use Google Marketplace and other features?



Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Most Recent Comments
rick merritt
 
antedeluvian
 
Susan Rambo
 
David Ashton
 
elizabethsimon
 
MeasurementBlues
 
MeasurementBlues
 
David Ashton
 
David Ashton
Most Recent Messages
2/10/2016
8:49:57 PM
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...
The LTC®3886 is a dual PolyPhase DC/DC synchronous ...
The LTC®2348-18 is an 18-bit, low noise 8-channel ...
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...
Chwan-Jye Foo (C.J Foo), product marketing manager for ...
The LT®3752/LT3752-1 are current mode PWM controllers ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...