Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 4 / 5   >   >>
Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Bert22306   12/7/2011 12:44:15 AM
NO RATINGS
"... system that would leave them high and DRY," is what I meant.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Bert22306   12/7/2011 12:36:43 AM
NO RATINGS
Public transportation does not get used enough, for the simple reason that it doesn't go everywhere people want to go, when they want to go. Plus, you need to run buses that are just about empty for much of the day, if you expect the system to be at all usable. Few people would depend on a public transporation system that might leave them high and drive, e.g. if they have to stay late at work. Unless there are no options. So it turns out not to be as efficient as you might think. I use public transportation to get to work every single day (well, not quite, I do have to drive to get to it), but it's useless for me on weekends. AND I have no illusions about our system being usable by everyone. Far from it. It's very inefficient between suburban areas, for example, yet many are employed in suburban office complexes these days. The future, I have no doubt, will be increasingly self-driving private transportation. At first, collision avoidance sensors. But it will go from there.

krisi
User Rank
CEO
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
krisi   12/7/2011 12:22:46 AM
NO RATINGS
I would rather have public transportation to be built than machine controlled individual car transportation, it would be so much more efficient...today I am going to work (in Vancouver, Canada) using SkyTrain technology that has no driver, is fully computer controlled and works flawlessly...it is much easier and cheaper to be built than some enormously complicated and error prone car controlled system...Kris

Peter Clarke
User Rank
Blogger
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Peter Clarke   12/6/2011 9:47:02 PM
NO RATINGS
But the process tends to be thus: Vendors make systems more complex/sophisticated because they can. To try and extract extra value the vendors describe extra features and benefits the system WILL/SHOULD have. Punters bite and the system works less well than expected for all sorts reasons; usually the unintended consequences of the added complexity. Punter tries to return to old simpler version of system to find it is no longer for sale.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Bert22306   12/6/2011 8:51:46 PM
NO RATINGS
On the smart car technology, I've been saying for some time now that the time will come when we'll look back and marvel that people were ever "allowed" to drive manually. How was this even possible? Consider this. There is a practical limit to how many roadways can be built, especially in sprawling urban areas. In the LA area, for example, they are even talking about double deck freeways. So one might wonder, why not use the same roads, but much, much more efficiently? And this can be done. You automate the whole process. Cars can be made to move faster, and be packed closer together, if you take human drivers out of the loop entirely. This sort of upgrade can be installed only on the most congested freeways at first. Doesn't have to be all or nothing. Side streets, rural roads, etc., can go on for a long time with manual driving. There are tons of examples of previously manual functions that are now always done automatically, and no one gives them a second thought. For cars, think of the choke, or the fuel-air mixture, or the spark advance, or even the gearbox. Automation makes all of these functions far, far more fuel efficient and less polluting. You wouldn't even think of installing an 8-gear manual transmission in cars, yet with an automatic, no problem.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Bert22306   12/6/2011 8:39:49 PM
NO RATINGS
Yes, the too wide temperature cycling range is a nuisance. But it is not the fault of IoT per se. That is a good example of what I'm talking about. Thermostats connected to HVAC systems have existed for a long time, and no one ever throught to give a a cathy name like M to M comms. Now that fancy thermostats might make use of IP, perhaps even to allow remote setting by a user, people make it sound like there's been a fundamental shift. But there hasn't. It's a simple evolutionary change, that may or may not fit people's needs.

sharps_eng
User Rank
Rookie
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
sharps_eng   12/6/2011 8:29:00 PM
NO RATINGS
I agree that heating needs to be smarter, more economical; can't our utilities synchronize our kettles / coffeepots /washers across the county to reduce peak loads? As long as it gets done overnight, I don't mind it taking a little longer because the thermostat has to wait ten minutes for a slot in the community power ring. Sort of like micro-power-cuts, but imperceptible to the user?

Bob Lacovara
User Rank
Rookie
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Bob Lacovara   12/6/2011 3:00:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Oops... I said "Dave" but meant "HAL".

Bob Lacovara
User Rank
Rookie
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Bob Lacovara   12/6/2011 2:59:11 PM
NO RATINGS
I suspect that widespread implementation of M2M technologies will result in much the same situations that arose when other innovative technologies were brought to prime time. The early innings are rough; features or abilities that aren't quite ready are frustrating; others do work, and are appreciated. With M2M, however, there is a large potential for abuse, and this will certainly result in all sorts of effort to mitigate the abuse. What will decide whether or not M2M is valuable is if it brings a something to the table. True, not all successful technologies bring anything of real value to the table: much of the worlds commerce is based on selling entertainment, something you can live without. But if auto fatality rates can be reduced by 1%, or if no one could start a car drunk, there'd be a lot of incentive to push the technology forward. I am less sanguine than that, however. I am a "if it's not broken, don't fix it" sort of guy: I like my car the way it is; I don't want it monitored by the thought police to hear my comments. I don't want my house wired for sound, or even my heating and living patterns. I don't care if it saves me $1000 a year, the less Big Brother knows about me, the better. I think it might be worse still if instead of Big Brother we have Dave... I suspect, though, in the end, people will wind up accepting limitations on their freedom and privacy in the name of safety and the public good. Just wait until the cops show up because you lit a cigar in your bedroom...

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: Do machines dream of IoT?
Duane Benson   12/6/2011 1:05:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Those of us who grew up steering and braking (and sometimes breaking) for ourselves will likely resist a lot of this type of automation. But the road goes on. My mom never really got used to cake mixes rather than baking from scratch. Many film photographers resisted digital for a long time. Many people will fear wide scale M2M, but most will eventually come around. My kids' kids will likely think actually driving for yourself to be a foreign as my kid do the thought of not having ubiquitous Internet.

<<   <   Page 4 / 5   >   >>


Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Carlos Bueno

Adventures in Userland
Carlos Bueno
Post a comment
Editor’s Note: Excerpted from Lauren Ipsum: A Story About Computer Science and Other Improbable Things, author Carlos Bueno introduces us to Lauren and her adventures in Userland. ...

Max Maxfield

Tired Old iPad 2 vs. Shiny New iPad Air 2
Max Maxfield
9 comments
I remember when the first iPad came out deep in the mists of time we used to call 2010. Actually, that's only four years ago, but it seems like a lifetime away -- I mean; can you remember ...

Martin Rowe

Make This Engineering Museum a Reality
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
Vincent Valentine is a man on a mission. He wants to make the first house to ever have a telephone into a telephone museum. Without help, it may not happen.

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...