Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>
KB3001
User Rank
CEO
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
KB3001   12/16/2011 2:38:37 PM
NO RATINGS
Not sure about your last paragraph, Frank. Managers can cross discipline lines, Engineers rarely do in comparison. I know managers who moved from electronic firms to pharmaceuticals, with no problems. The skills required/involved are relatively much more generic in management.

KB3001
User Rank
CEO
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
KB3001   12/16/2011 2:34:22 PM
NO RATINGS
In theory, that's partly why managers' salaries are higher. The risk for them is higher if they lose their jobs. That said, in practice, managers use their jobs to look for the next opportunity. They build networks and overarching knowledge that Engineers cannot easily get. Even if/when they lose their jobs, they usually bounce back quickly.

Bert22306
User Rank
CEO
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
Bert22306   12/15/2011 11:17:54 PM
NO RATINGS
I graduated from undergraduate school during tough times for engineers as well. So, after a short military tour, I too enrolled in graduate school. By the time that was over, the economy had picked up again, and I had no trouble finding my first job. Grad school helps too! If you can swing it, especially if you're young, get more education when the job market is bad. That's my suggestion. And Frank makes an excellent point. Engineers that go into management have a harder time going back to real engineering work. The reason is, they fall behind. I see this happening all the time. It's like they taught us in engineering school. You're in school primarily to learn how to learn. What you learned in school becomes hopelessly obsolete in very few years. In my experience, and it hardly matters what the manager did before management, managers get out of the real continuous learning loop, and soon develop the mindset that they cannot understand the details of what they are managing. How often do you notice that managers learn most of what they know exclusively by attending meetings? Can't be good.

mayur.sarode
User Rank
Rookie
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
mayur.sarode   12/15/2011 8:53:53 PM
NO RATINGS
I was laid off in Feb 2009.I had a "dream job" in a telecom company before I had graduated. The lay off led me to take a masters degree in electrical engineering. I am working in a young dynamic research company in Netherlands, developing sensors. I could not had asked for more. You only fail in life when you accept it as a failure.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
Duane Benson   12/15/2011 6:53:57 PM
NO RATINGS
I lost a job in late 2001 and wasn't back to full-time employment for four years. During that time though, I did some consulting work and tried a couple of times to start businesses. I did end up back working for someone else in 2005, but the time I spend trying to design, build and sell small robot brains kept my mind fresh and my skill set growing. Even if I didn't end up with a successful business of my own, the benefits of pushing myself to keep my brain going were very worthwhile.

ManasK.RayChaudhuri
User Rank
Rookie
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
ManasK.RayChaudhuri   12/15/2011 3:43:42 PM
NO RATINGS
Thanks a lot.You have given the key to a thought process.

wave.forest
User Rank
Manager
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
wave.forest   12/15/2011 3:00:11 PM
NO RATINGS
I can't agree you more on the observation on the managers conveted from engineers. Most of them are the first line managers and in many cases got lost in their managerial roles. Their roles can be the best valued ones, however, if they "manage" themselves better by catching up the cutting-ege technology. My observation is that those who take leadership and coach their subordinates rarely have difficulty to find another job since they always confident to get things done.

eembedded_janitor
User Rank
Rookie
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
eembedded_janitor   12/14/2011 11:19:11 PM
NO RATINGS
Exactly right! The key is to keep your skills current. Engage with open source projects or experiment with a DIY-drone or whatever to keep the blade sharp. If you find yourself in management then it is far too easy to get disconnected from real-world changes. Keep current. The absolute worst thing you can do is relax into a job and let that define your career.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
old account Frank Eory   12/14/2011 11:11:39 PM
NO RATINGS
There are many ways to keep your skills current, but the need and desire to do so presumes that in your last job and the next job you hope to get, you are actually doing engineering work. Many engineers end up in management, which is all fine and good, except that after awhile many of them are too far gone to ever go back to the trenches and do real engineering work. Some people believe that engineers are a dime a dozen these days. If that's true, then managers must be a nickel a dozen. No disrespect meant to managers, it's simply supply & demand. Relatively speaking, the ratio of unemployed managers to management job openings seems much larger than the ratio of unemployed engineers to engineering job openings. I don't have hard data to support that, it's just my observation of people I know who have been laid of over the last 3 years.

EREBUS0
User Rank
Rookie
re: Key to survival: Manage your career
EREBUS0   12/14/2011 10:33:08 PM
NO RATINGS
When I got into the electronics industry in the 1970's the rule of thumb was that you had about 20 years before your skills were overcome by events. I therefore looked into ways to extend my career and make proactive decisions rather than be overtaken by events. The best advice I can give engineers today is to understand that only they can manage their careers. Each decision has consequences that you have to consider. One friend of mine just wanted to work in a lab and build circuits, so he made decisions where he got to do that type of work. Granted, he did not make as much money as some of the younger engineers, but he did what he enjoyed. In the end, that's all that counts.

<<   <   Page 3 / 4   >   >>


Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

DIY Practical Joke Project Idea
Max Maxfield
1 Comment
I just received a rather interesting email from a member of the EETimes community who prefers to remain anonymous. This message was as follows:

Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock

Jolt Awards: The Best Books
Jolt Judges and Andrew Binstock
1 Comment
As we do every year, Dr. Dobb's recognizes the best books of the last 12 months via the Jolt Awards -- our cycle of product awards given out every two months in each of six categories. No ...

Engineering Investigations

Air Conditioner Falls From Window, Still Works
Engineering Investigations
2 comments
It's autumn in New England. The leaves are turning to red, orange, and gold, my roses are in their second bloom, and it's time to remove the air conditioner from the window. On September ...

David Blaza

The Other Tesla
David Blaza
5 comments
I find myself going to Kickstarter and Indiegogo on a regular basis these days because they have become real innovation marketplaces. As far as I'm concerned, this is where a lot of cool ...