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Peter Clarke
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re: ARM customer ranking
Peter Clarke   1/12/2012 6:44:52 PM
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@james_cranshaw Thanks for that information.

John.Donovan
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re: ARM customer ranking
John.Donovan   1/12/2012 6:18:53 PM
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So where's NXP, an all-ARM company? Surely they're not still paying mostly license fees in contrast to royalties, which is where the real money is. Or are all these other guys just so much bigger?

James_B_Crawshaw
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re: ARM customer ranking
James_B_Crawshaw   1/12/2012 6:06:38 PM
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I asked Bloomberg to check the Intel figure and they said it was an error and they removed it from their database. Pity Nomura didn't check before publishing. I checked with ARM, and Intel (post Infineon wireless acquisition) is a top 10 customer. But ARM have never given a revenue breakdown by customer so I'm not sure where the rest of the Bloomberg data comes from ...

elPresidente
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re: ARM customer ranking
elPresidente   1/12/2012 5:26:39 PM
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You guys are all techno-paparazzi Who cares?

ARM_Linked
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re: ARM customer ranking
ARM_Linked   1/12/2012 5:15:46 PM
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Hello all, These numbers do not seem stupid but interesting because knowing customers of a company (more, ranking) is always a bit taboo. I posted this discussion in ARM Based Group community because and added ARM's 2010 Annual Report (http://www.linkedin.com/groups/ARM-Inside-in-proportion-7-85447.S.88812149?qid=680c98d6-b2bc-41ab-8f32-dddd59e137cd&trk=group_most_popular-0-b-ttl&goback=%2Egmp_85447%2Egde_85447_member_88812149%2Egmp_85447). Kinldy, ARM-Linked

Edevaldo
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re: ARM customer ranking
Edevaldo   1/12/2012 3:41:52 PM
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I think that Intel and AMD revenue might be due to some sort of Patent cross licensing.

Peter Clarke
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re: ARM customer ranking
Peter Clarke   1/12/2012 10:14:28 AM
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@kalpak Funny :D But with the the Transitive processor emulation technology developed by Alisdair Rawsthorne at Univ of Manchester that would not be an impossibility. The Transitive technology was used by both Intel and Apple in the mid-2000s, and the technology was eventually bought by IBM as I remember. However, ever I think it was mainly applied to PowerPC-x86 emulations.

kalpak
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re: ARM customer ranking
kalpak   1/12/2012 9:43:39 AM
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Intel biggest customer of ARM?! Ah a conspiracy theory. Some of the new low power Intel chips are really ARM cores emulating the X86 instruction set. This way AMD can be kept in the dark of how Intel has achieved such a low power in their devices.

fergie1965
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re: ARM customer ranking
fergie1965   1/12/2012 5:05:19 AM
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It is not appropriate for me to discuss the specific top 15 ranking listed by Nomura. But I thought I could add a couple of clarifications using public data that might be of interest 1) The per-device royalty is typically a % of the device's ASP. One of the main drivers we discussed that caused this to drop in that time period was the rapid growth in MCU shipments where the ASPs are substantially lower (NXP as one example has devices priced at less than $1) than devices in smartphones 2) Of the $631.3M in FY10, ARM reported that the contribution of Physical IP (ARM aquired Artisan as opposed to Virage, the latter being purchased by Synopsys) royalty was $43.8M. Processor royalty for that year was $291.5M. So the majority of our revenue in that year came from processors

Frank Daley
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re: ARM customer ranking
Frank Daley   1/12/2012 3:51:00 AM
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Since Nvidia is mostly fabless, its Tegra family would probably account for much of the TSMC number. With the resolve of the legal dispute between Intel and Nvidia, it is possible that Nvidia has also used Intel for some manufacturing.

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