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rajenr
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re: ARM customer ranking
rajenr   1/11/2012 8:36:35 PM
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I think people forget that ARM has a physical libraries, IO cells libraries and memory compilers and other assorted physical IP as part of the Virage acquisition. Given Intels scale of revenues I am sure thats where the money is coming from. Not ARM CPU licences.

Deepak Sekar
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re: ARM customer ranking
Deepak Sekar   1/11/2012 7:23:25 PM
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Forgot to say AMD could be due to some legacy ATI products made at TSMC...

Deepak Sekar
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re: ARM customer ranking
Deepak Sekar   1/11/2012 7:18:01 PM
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If this data is true, it could be due to Intel's acquisition of Infineon's wireless division.

Peter Clarke
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re: ARM customer ranking
Peter Clarke   1/11/2012 6:33:01 PM
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Intel as ARM's biggest customer is 2010 is odd - but foundry manufacture is good call Rick. Intel maybe making stuff for Apple that includes ARM cores. I wonder who AMD was making stuff for..they were almost (but not quite?) out of manufacturing by 2010 with the creation of Globalfoundries.

rick merritt
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re: ARM customer ranking
rick merritt   1/11/2012 6:08:12 PM
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The Nomura list, if correct, suggests that ARM gets more of its royalties from companies MAKING chips with its cores as opposed to DESIGNING OR SELLING those chips. That would explain TSMC and Samsung being ahead of say Qualcomm and Apple. And it would imply Intel may be acting as foundry to some ARM-based chips. But this is all guesswork on my part.

Peter Clarke
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re: ARM customer ranking
Peter Clarke   1/11/2012 3:06:57 PM
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I think ARM's policy has always been not to take too much out of their partners, so as to be the much lower cost option and to be non-threatening. Of course after 20 years of following that policy they are now in a good position to start cranking up license fees and royalty rates. I think initial license fees have gone from about $1 million per core to $5 million but ARM would, I am sure, argue that they are providing much greater performance on ARM15 than on ARM7 so paying more is appropriate. And it is very hard to compare like with like as license varieties have increased. With regard to royalty rates even if ARM does push them up, their customers go to higher and higher volumes thereby earning discounts so that the average ARM royalty per shipped unit is actually going down. According to ARM supplied data it was 6.1 cents per unit in 2007, 5.7 cents in 2008, 5.4 cents in 2009 and 4.8 cents in 2010. But over the same period units shipped per year had gone from 2.9 billion to 6.1 billion.

any1
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re: ARM customer ranking
any1   1/11/2012 1:59:39 PM
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It continues to surprise me that given the ubiquitous presence of ARM cores in all things mobile that their business model does not generate more revenue. Given their out sized importance to many companies you would think that they could charge more.

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As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

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