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entity279
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re: European startup attempts processor revolution
entity279   1/25/2012 10:56:06 AM
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Perhaps the difference between this processor and others before it comes down to peformance. The promised 200 GFLOPS at 5W is quite an achievement, I would say.

Jayson Five
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re: European startup attempts processor revolution
Jayson Five   1/25/2012 5:55:09 AM
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Riddle: What do you call a beast configured like a kilocore only it's a MEGAcore? A single Power PC processing core hooked up to an FPGA. Which requires the hapless software programmer to also be a logic designer. Which degenerates to a situation where you have no software traction, and therefore no apps, and therefore no customers, and therefore no real product. Just a really cool idea that doesn't quite fly.

david.may
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re: European startup attempts processor revolution
david.may   1/24/2012 9:57:01 PM
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on a side note i really think its the right time for "kilocore" Michael O'Brien, tranputer/XMOS pioneer dave may, and ARM Inc to get together with some VC and make a mass produced ARM A15/ Mali T600 based Achronix FPGA on the 22nm or lower Intel Process ASAP ;)

david.may
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re: European startup attempts processor revolution
david.may   1/24/2012 9:14:42 PM
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"startup attempts many-core revolution" i have to agree jayson, infact its already been done before a long time ago now April 4, 2006 in the so called Rapport Inc's "kilocore" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Kilocore "Kilocore, from Rapport Inc. and IBM, is a high-performance, low-power multi-core microprocessor that has 1,025 cores. It contains a single PowerPC processing core, and 1,024 eight-bit Processing Elements running at 125 MHz each, which can be dynamically reconfigured, connected by a shared interconnect. It allows high performance parallel processing." and OC lets not forget to give other credit wher eits due too, that being dave may (not related :) of XMOS many multicore fame..... sure this France pretenders version is using more modern process and adds current busses etc but lets not forget the past and still living broard shoulders Joel Monnier is standing on...

Jayson Five
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re: European startup attempts processor revolution
Jayson Five   1/24/2012 6:30:01 PM
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A "general purpose" 5 watt 256 VLIW flow processor for "embedded applications" in the fields of "image processing, signal processing, control (??), communications and data security"? Doesn't sound too general purpose to me. Am I missing something here? In the least, the application needs to be amenable to flow processing. That's why there aren't any "general purpose" many-core flow-processors out there. So what's the angle here?

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