Design Con 2015
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>
Battar
User Rank
Rookie
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
Battar   2/2/2012 4:10:03 PM
NO RATINGS
If I remember correctly, the music preceding the start of programming (in the early 70's on the BBC) was Theodirakis's "Zorba the Greek" (The theme from the movie).

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
Max The Magnificent   2/2/2012 1:40:36 PM
NO RATINGS
LOL

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Blogger
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
Max The Magnificent   2/2/2012 1:40:26 PM
NO RATINGS
I think that one came quite a bit later ... but I may be wrong... I wonder if the originals are preserved anywhere?

chrisshore
User Rank
Blogger
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
chrisshore   2/2/2012 10:00:40 AM
NO RATINGS
When I was a student, watching TV late at night in the college TV room, it was the done thing so stay up until the channels all shut down, played the national anthem, showed the test card, whistled for a bit and then shut down completely. Watching the picture slowly shrink and disappear into a little white dot in the centre of the screen was generally the signal to go to bed. Or check if the bar was still open...

Pricey
User Rank
Rookie
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
Pricey   2/2/2012 9:27:25 AM
NO RATINGS
I remember the BBC one having a little girl in the centre circle drawing on a blackboard I think the Test Card was accompanied by music and the high pitched whistle accompanied a grey fizzing screen when no picture was transmitted at all

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
old account Frank Eory   1/31/2012 3:27:52 PM
NO RATINGS
I remember the late night sign-offs, particularly fighter jets flying overhead while the national anthem played. Here's a guy who made a website aggregating a broad collection of various sign-offs from TV stations across the U.S. -- http://www.tv-signoffs.com/

agk
User Rank
Rookie
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
agk   1/31/2012 1:06:11 PM
NO RATINGS
these test patterns were sent to test overall performance of the video communication systems.Nowadays we do not receive these test patterns and we do not know how good is our televisions with respect to linearity,picture size,aspect ratio,bandwidth etc.

cjgtrnj
User Rank
Rookie
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
cjgtrnj   1/31/2012 11:03:28 AM
NO RATINGS
I have an American test pattern board in my closet from when we were doing amateur tv in the Bronx NYC in the 70's those were the days. 7 tv stations, off at midnight with Quality programming. The old saying when they has mystery programs on the radio, radio is for people with minds, TV is for people who are mindless. You could close your eyes listening to some programs on the radio and envision the whole scenario. not any more ....

zeeglen
User Rank
Blogger
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
zeeglen   1/30/2012 10:54:16 PM
NO RATINGS
In North America we had the "Indian Head" test pattern seen here http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Indian_Head_test_card The circle allowed TV receiver adjustments of vertical height and linearity, the better TVs had separate linearity controls for the top and bottom of the screen. Some even had horizontal width adjustment. With the advent of colour TV the shop convergence test generator replaced this broadcast test pattern. I remember the Canadian national anthem at the beginning of every Saturday afternoon cinema, we all stood proudly to watch the coast-to-coast flyover. Then the newsreel, cartoon, serial, finally the movie. When we eventually moved to an area that had broadcast TV available there were only 2 English channels (CBC and CTV), the French CBC, and a snowy channel from just over the USA border. One needed a high mast and high gain rooftop antenna for the American station and had to have the good fortune of no metallic structures in the line of sight. And remember how an aircraft flying overhead or a Ford going down the street would raise all sorts of havoc with the reception?

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: How It Was: Watching the test card on TV
Duane Benson   1/30/2012 9:37:03 PM
NO RATINGS
Depending on the channel, our stations would stop broadcasting some time from 10:00pm (for PBS) to midnight or perhaps 2:00am. The stations would typically play the national anthem. We wouldn't stand though. I think you only do that in public in America. After the anthem some channels would go to the test pattern and others to static. I recall what looked more like an electronically generated pattern than a physical card. On weekends some of the stations would stay on later playing such SciFi classics as "Them", "The Day The Earth Stood Still" and "The Monolith Monsters." I think the stations typically started broadcasting again at 5:00 or 6:00am, but I wasn't up that early to know for sure.

<<   <   Page 2 / 3   >   >>


Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
<b><a href=Betajet">

The Circle – The Future's Imperfect in the Present Tense
Betajet
5 comments
The Circle, a satirical, dystopian novel published in 2013 by San Francisco-based writer Dave Eggers, is about a large, very powerful technology company that combines aspects of Google, ...

Max Maxfield

Recommended Reads From the Engineer's Bookshelf
Max Maxfield
27 comments
I'm not sure if I read more than most folks or not, but I do I know that I spend quite a lot of time reading. I hate to be idle, so I always have a book or two somewhere about my person -- ...

Martin Rowe

Make This Engineering Museum a Reality
Martin Rowe
Post a comment
Vincent Valentine is a man on a mission. He wants to make the first house to ever have a telephone into a telephone museum. Without help, it may not happen.

Rich Quinnell

Making the Grade in Industrial Design
Rich Quinnell
16 comments
As every developer knows, there are the paper specifications for a product design, and then there are the real requirements. The paper specs are dry, bland, and rigidly numeric, making ...

Special Video Section
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...
General-purpose DACs have applications in instrumentation, ...
Linear Technology demonstrates its latest measurement ...
10:29
Demos from Maxim Integrated at Electronica 2014 show ...
Bosch CEO Stefan Finkbeiner shows off latest combo and ...
STMicroelectronics demoed this simple gesture control ...
Keysight shows you what signals lurk in real-time at 510MHz ...
TE Connectivity's clear-plastic, full-size model car shows ...
Why culture makes Linear Tech a winner.
Recently formed Architects of Modern Power consortium ...
Specially modified Corvette C7 Stingray responds to ex Indy ...
Avago’s ACPL-K30T is the first solid-state driver qualified ...
NXP launches its line of multi-gate, multifunction, ...
Doug Bailey, VP of marketing at Power Integrations, gives a ...
See how to ease software bring-up with DesignWare IP ...
DesignWare IP Prototyping Kits enable fast software ...
This video explores the LT3086, a new member of our LDO+ ...
In today’s modern electronic systems, the need for power ...