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Max The Magnificent
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
Max The Magnificent   2/20/2012 6:13:39 PM
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Hi Brian -- two things -- the first is that the ancient Egyptians had water clocks that varied throughout the year such that they always had 12 hours of daylight and 12 hours of nighttime -- it's just that the lengths of the hours varied from month to month. The second is that I heard that the number of heart attacks rise for the first week or two after the time changes ... maybe not by huge amounts but certainly by measurable amounts -- so in a day daylight savings time is killing us :-(

BrianBailey
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
BrianBailey   2/20/2012 6:27:07 PM
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Can you imaging the uproar that would exist today if the hours got longer in summer -and you still had to work from 9-5. People would only want to work in Winter. What would happen as well to all of the measurements that depend on time. Would things go 'slower' in summer...

old account Frank Eory
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
old account Frank Eory   2/20/2012 8:54:17 PM
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I don't miss DST even a little. With the changes in the switchover dates in recent years, I have a hard time remembering what time it is elsewhere, but a nice advantage of never changing your clocks is you always know what time it is where you live :)

David Ashton
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
David Ashton   2/21/2012 12:02:31 AM
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Coming from Zimbabwe where daylight length varies only about half an hour either way, I had a hard time getting used to DST in Australia. Most folk here seem to like it, it gives you a few extra hours after work to play sport or (in my case) mow the lawn. I'm pretty ambivalent about it, one thing I do like is that it makes dawn at a normal time instead of 5 am or earlier so you don't have to have blackout curtains to get your beauty sleep in (no, I know it doesn't work for me :-) My mom is in UK, so it makes for some serious head scratching trying to work out what time it is over there (4 different differences thru the year). Thank god for Google.

BrianBailey
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
BrianBailey   2/21/2012 3:26:29 AM
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Be careful what you wish for when related to Google. They just might steal it - as they seem to be doing more and more these days.

David Ashton
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
David Ashton   2/21/2012 4:07:32 AM
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Point taken Brian - though about the most I use Google for is finding the time in other places, finding Datasheets, etc. I don't use them for much else. Though I guess they'll be trying to get personal info off us there as well soon....

Wnderer
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CEO
re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
Wnderer   2/21/2012 6:01:23 PM
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We need to make the days for the first half of the year one minute shorter and the days for the second half of the year one minute longer. We can call the second half of the year summore time and the first half sumless time.:)

BrianBailey
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
BrianBailey   2/21/2012 7:30:06 PM
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There is certainly no prize for the corniest comment!

Max The Magnificent
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
Max The Magnificent   2/21/2012 7:57:44 PM
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Bummer -- in that case I'll keep my comment to myself :-)

chrisshore
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re: What were they thinking: Summer Time
chrisshore   2/23/2012 10:01:14 AM
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In the UK, we are spun the line that people don't like getting up in the dark. Personally, I would rather have as many hours of daylight as possible after I come home from work. I tend not to do my socialising/going out/shopping/sport/walking the dog etc before work - I do it afterwards. So I don't personally much care whether it's dark when I cycle in to work in the morning. I prefer it to be light when I get home and to stay light for as long as possible between then and bedtime. But DST here is aimed at making it lighter in the morning, which doesn't bother me at all! We are spun the line that more children die going to school in the dark then coming home in the dark. There is some truth in this I'm sure - the start of school in the morning coincides with morning rush hour so we'd like as much light as possible whereas school finished in the afternoon long before rush hour starts so we don't care if it's dark then. There is some guff about it saving power as well but I've never been convinced of that one. There's a lovely anomaly you may not have heard in Arizona which has always raised a chuckle. The state of Arizona does not observe DST. However the Navajo Reservation (which lies mostly within AZ) does change to Daylight time. The Hopi Reservation (which is wholly within the Navajo Reservation) does not observe DST. This means that a straight line journey taking you through both reservations involves putting your clock back or forward four times in the space of a couple of hundred miles! Only in America... Chris

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