Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
LarryM99
User Rank
CEO
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
LarryM99   3/14/2012 10:10:18 PM
NO RATINGS
Either an April Fool's prank or a granted patent. It's getting harder and harder to tell those two things apart these days... Larry M.

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
old account Frank Eory   3/14/2012 8:25:04 PM
NO RATINGS
As soon as I read "have solved the problem of radio congestion by cleverly twisting radio waves into the shape of fusilli pasta" I assumed it was an early April Fool's joke :)

PJames
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
PJames   3/14/2012 7:17:58 PM
NO RATINGS
Actually, MIMO techniques very easily decode 2 streams of data on cross polarized antenna even in the presence of the sources of "coupling" or "interference" you mention. It would seem this article is claiming something beyond that, however.

ivovi
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
ivovi   3/14/2012 1:28:01 PM
NO RATINGS
Hmmmm. Although I think the experiment is OK, but... 1) This is nothing new - it is just subset of spatial diversity system or MIMO theory, as you want. 2) No infinite information space is embeded in this as stated. 3) Just more antenna makes more capacity, but only for short distance. I higly reccomend this paper from Lund University: http://lup.lub.lu.se/luur/download?func=downloadFile&recordOId=2062936&fileOId=2339120

agk
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
agk   3/13/2012 11:00:33 AM
NO RATINGS
This seems to be a narrow beam width application suitable for point to point communication. Even if it is so lot of bandwidth saved. Is this possible in omni directional communications?

MeirG
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
MeirG   3/13/2012 10:12:48 AM
NO RATINGS
Yes indeed, this is yet another multiplexing method, polarization. And the technology hurdles are quite high. Polarization changes with reflections from buildings, trees, fog, rain, and other objects. The interference of direct and reflected waves at the reception antenna (antennae?) makes the polarization rather complex, if not impossible to decode. But hey, other technologies also looked impossible when proposed, so... lets hope!

BOB GUNNELS
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
BOB GUNNELS   3/13/2012 9:49:22 AM
NO RATINGS
This is either an April fools joke that was mistakenly published several weeks too early, or it is just another scam to solicit investments from the uninformed.

masher
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
masher   3/13/2012 12:10:46 AM
NO RATINGS
I can't see the video or get to the article on this PC but this just sounds like a combination of FDMA and TDMA signals multiplex with antennas using right an left hand circular polarization of multiple carriers. Early Comunity microwave tv used similar methods with 2 different linear polarizations on the same carrier frequency. I remember mechanically changing the feedhorn from horizontal to vertiocal polarization to null the other signal years ago in home brew 2.4 Ghz tv receivers.

PJames
User Rank
Rookie
re: Radio waves beamed with a twist allow massive multiplexing
PJames   3/12/2012 9:30:36 PM
NO RATINGS
Can anyone provide a quick description of what this really is or isn't? The paper makes some reference to discrete photon quantum eigenstates in the introduction. A quick glance at the rest of the paper makes it seem as if maybe what they are doing is simply using circularly polarized antennas and somehow tracking dynamic multipath spatial nulls created by the signal rotation. I'm I way off base? Does this look real or simply smoke and mirrors?



Flash Poll
EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Engineer's Bookshelf
Caleb Kraft

The Martian: A Delightful Exploration of Math, Mars & Feces
Caleb Kraft
6 comments
To say that Andy Weir's The Martian is an exploration of math, Mars, and feces is a slight simplification. I doubt that the author would have any complaints, though.

The Engineering Life - Around the Web
Caleb Kraft

Surprise TOQ Teardown at EELive!
Caleb Kraft
Post a comment
This year, for EELive! I had a little surprise that I was quite eager to share. Qualcomm had given us a TOQ smart watch in order to award someone a prize. We were given complete freedom to ...

Design Contests & Competitions
Caleb Kraft

Join The Balancing Act With April's Caption Contest
Caleb Kraft
58 comments
Sometimes it can feel like you're really performing in the big tent when presenting your hardware. This month's caption contest exemplifies this wonderfully.

Engineering Investigations
Caleb Kraft

Frankenstein's Fix: The Winners Announced!
Caleb Kraft
8 comments
The Frankenstein's Fix contest for the Tektronix Scope has finally officially come to an end. We had an incredibly amusing live chat earlier today to announce the winners. However, we ...

Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)