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Max The Magnificent
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re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
Max The Magnificent   3/19/2012 4:54:08 PM
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Hey -- you don;t need an excuse -- 10CC were GREAT -- I still remember the summer of 1975 listening to "I'm not in love" by 10CC -- this ended up being one of the most covered songs in pop/rock history!

Duane Benson
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re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
Duane Benson   3/19/2012 4:45:51 PM
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Antedeluvian - Do you have any recording software that will automatically break the recorded MP3 file at the pauses between songs? Or did you still have to do that manually? As for 10CC - the 70's were weird so I'll use that as my excuse.

antedeluvian
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re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
antedeluvian   3/19/2012 1:39:35 PM
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I'm not sure I would admit to 10cc in public. I actually did convert all ~150 LPs of mine to MP3. Took a while especially when some weren't in pristine condition and I had to massage the content to get rid of the clicks and pops. Got a USB turntable at Radio Shack and it worked just fine. I had a much harder time scanning all my data books.

Duane Benson
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re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
Duane Benson   3/18/2012 5:38:04 PM
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And speaking of 10CC, ELO, Queen, Supertramp, Genesis, or the Beatles; that brings up another preservation issue I've wrestled with from time to time. Say you have a nice library of vinyl (I guess they don't call them "LPs" or "records" anymore) or cassette tapes collected over years and don't want to spend the same money again for something you've already purchased. How can you, without spending a year on the task, reasonably get your music into the computer? I know you can find or make a patch cable from your turn-table or cassette deck and sit there stopping and starting every three minutes or so. That's fine if you have a small enough collection to deal with in a Saturday afternoon. But what of hundreds of LPs and cassettes? It's certainly doable, but if I don't find a more automated way of dealing with the task, all of that music will fade away too. I've also got some old reel to reel tapes of my grandparents and, of course, lot's of home videos. It's easy to think that we can just keep copying our Jepg files from medium but in a decade or two, we'll end up with the same issue with our digital files.

Max The Magnificent
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re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
Max The Magnificent   3/16/2012 8:52:55 PM
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@"Just remember to do backups to the cloud" Assuming we don't wipe ourselves from the face of the planet, it's amazing to think that all of this stuff might still be in the cloud is say 100 or 200 years time... ...but who will look at it? Will the folks of that time say "lets do some housekeeping and wipe out any family photos from more than 100 years ago" .... or will storage evolve such that they can afford to keep this stuff indefinitely?

Duane Benson
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re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
Duane Benson   3/16/2012 7:50:14 PM
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Well, a cold beer might very well be called for. Still, an alternative perspective is that the reason we can't come close to experiencing even a small fraction of the available knowledge is that we are exposed to so much. We can pick and choose just about any bit of knowledge in the world (and off) to study. In the days of Cook and Darwin, most folks were probably exposed to little more than maybe a 50 mile circle around their place of birth. The typical well educated Renaissance man, in a life time, might have traveled across an ocean or from one side of a continent to the other once - might have. With few books available, the knowledge available to stuff into one's brain was severely limited, even relative to the compendium of all human knowledge at the time. I know who Harold Lloyd and Buster Keaton are. I really doubt that my kids or any of their friends do. On the other hand, I've sat with my kids and watched live broadcast of the space shuttle heading up to orbit and I've sat with them and examined, in pretty good detail, the surface of Mars. I've mused with them on whether quarks are the smallest particle or built of even smaller particles. Even things that were much more present in time when I was a kid are in many ways far more accessible now than then. I was pretty interested in history and science as are my kids but as much as I tried to learn all I could about some subjects, my kids know significantly more about those same subjects than I did. And, I've been able to go through that self-learning process with them, so I've now been exposed to all of that extra fascinating detail too. We just have to (or get to) pick and choose what we want to know. If I wanted to read "The Age of Wonder" or some of Darwin's writings, I could be doing so in less than ten minutes. I'm cool with that.

old account Frank Eory
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Rookie
re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
old account Frank Eory   3/16/2012 7:49:48 PM
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Several years ago when I had the occasion to buy a nice new scanner, I took on the project of scanning all my old pre-digital photos. I was always one of those who kept the sleeved negatives in the envelope with the prints, and by scanning the negatives I was able to get stunningly nice digital copies of all those old photographic memories. A few of the really old ones from the 70s needed color correction after scanning, but that too worked out very well. As for making sense of all the stored info and identifying people in the photos, have you tried the facial recognition feature in Google's Picasa? I continue to be impressed by how well it works -- so well in fact, that on the rare occasions where it has made mistakes it has opened my eyes to things I never noticed before -- like how much one family member's baby pictures resemble those of another. With facial recognition plus the information now stored in digital photos, especially geo-tagging, it is even easier today to not lose track of those details like where and when a photo was taken and who are the people in the photo. Just remember to do backups to the cloud so you never lose those records of your personal history!

RichQ
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Staff
re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
RichQ   3/16/2012 7:22:37 PM
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My family photos are fading, the negatives are getting scratched and dusty, the slides are slowly becoming transparant, losing blue first. At least the digital image doesn't decay, only the storage media. If needed, we can always copy the images to a new storage medium as formats and technology change. Making sense of all this stored information, on the other hand, is a challenge no one has an answer for yet.

Max The Magnificent
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Blogger
re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
Max The Magnificent   3/16/2012 7:15:35 PM
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@"They may not even think to try and preserve it when I'm gone." That's another sad thing -- families have boxes of photos, but no one knows who they are. In many cases you have to ask your parents "who is this" .. .when your parents are gone no one has a clue... How many times has someone passed away and their relatives find a box of old photos (treasured by the previous owner) and no one wants them so they get thrown out... I think we just have to accept that the main use of our personal photos is as an aid to memory -- I look at mine and say "I remember that holiday" or "I remember that person" ... when I die no one will care ... Now you are making me feel really despondent ... I think a cold beer will soon be called for :-)

RichQ
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Staff
re: Lost in time like tears in rain. [pause] Time to die.
RichQ   3/16/2012 7:13:54 PM
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I thought that was Edward G. Robinson, asking specifically for "light classical" as his death-theme music. Yes, it is sad to think there may come a time when Earth's beauty is as forgotten as that of the Hanging Gardens of Babylon, which once were a wonder of the world. Let us hope that we're wise enough to never let that happen to our home.

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