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selinz
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re: A closer look at Everspin's MRAM technology
selinz   4/12/2012 5:37:34 PM
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In the end, it seems like bytes/$ always wins out. When MRAM gets a bit closer, it'll take off.

antiquus
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re: A closer look at Everspin's MRAM technology
antiquus   4/11/2012 3:15:54 PM
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Although I'm not familiar with lithographic density, I do know that NAND has benefited from packaging improvements. Extreme back grinding allows multi-die packages (up to 16 for Toshiba), and the die are larger (over 200 sq.mm), so that "1000x" you see may be considerably less.

tb1
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re: A closer look at Everspin's MRAM technology
tb1   4/10/2012 11:11:10 PM
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MRAM is much faster than Flash. Maybe it can be used as a non-volatile cache for solid state or even spinning-disk based hard drives. Or even build a small hard drive out of it for the OS, for incredibly fast boot times.

old account Frank Eory
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re: A closer look at Everspin's MRAM technology
old account Frank Eory   4/10/2012 10:24:25 PM
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It depends on the application requirements. In some applications, the infinite durability of MRAM vs. the limited lifetime of flash is well worth the trade-off in die area efficiency.

toom_tabard
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re: A closer look at Everspin's MRAM technology
toom_tabard   4/10/2012 6:01:03 PM
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Doing a "back of the envelope" calculation to compare this MRAM density to state of the art NAND, I get about over a 1000-times less density for MRAM. Granted, MRAM may have more scalability "juice" left in it while NAND may be close to the brick wall, but the old argument arises: are the benefits of MRAM enough to replace NAND in SSD?



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