Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Chuck.Hill
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
Chuck.Hill   4/27/2012 6:26:06 PM
NO RATINGS
After 6 months, the truck made its way to Fla, and they determined that the computer system was malfunctioning. They replaced the computer module, several sensors and a lot of the wiring. The problem wasn't so much the computer technology as was putting on a British made engine . . . that leaked oil. It managed to damage some of the wiring which I guess in turn fried some of the components.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
Duane Benson   4/20/2012 5:49:28 PM
NO RATINGS
I owned a Vega back in the day. Actually two Vega bodies and three engines. The first one had a disagreement with a pile of concrete debris on the side of the road. The car kind of bent in the middle and I drove it around for another six months with a big gap in at one point in the passenger door frame due to the bent frame. I also replaced the right front fender with one I made out of plywood. I eventually bought another Vega to replace the first. Not that that's an interesting story, but I was a big Vega fan and really wanted a Cosworth. I think that's a case of setting really high aspirations in a really low bracket.

RNB
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
RNB   4/20/2012 12:40:13 PM
NO RATINGS
When the '75 & '76 Cosworth Vega's were built, it and the Cadillac Eldorado were the only U.S. cars available with Electronic Fuel Injection and they were totally analog. Each dealer zone was supplied with a diagnostic tester. Never heard of a 'truck' with special equipment. Today we would first check the ignition module in the distributor. Only 3508 Cosworth's were made in its two years. A small but energetic group of owners, the CVOA, meet once a year around the U.S. with their cars. See www.cosworthvega.com

Randall
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
Randall   4/17/2012 12:05:42 AM
NO RATINGS
Many of those early "computer" systems were fully analog, and not even as complicated as an (analog) television. But servicing them was practically impossible, because the manufacturers didn't give enough information even about what they were supposed to do, let alone how they did it. Which was a shame, because many mechanics were so scared of them that the first thing they always did was to replace the "computer". Even if you were only there for a flat tire!

HeadhunterBKS
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
HeadhunterBKS   4/13/2012 10:56:21 PM
NO RATINGS
The most probable fault was water in the fuel system. I have seen countless dollars thrown every where but. B

przemek
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
przemek   4/13/2012 9:16:17 PM
NO RATINGS
On the other hand, when my trusty 160kmi Camry started sputtering, I plugged in my OBD reader, read out code 'Cyl1 ignition circuit failure' via Bluetooth on my Droid smartphone, Googled directions to the nearest dealer, bought the ignition module, installed it right outside the parts store, and was back in business. Thank you, California environmental extremists, for the OBD-II.

WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
WKetel   4/13/2012 9:15:31 PM
NO RATINGS
I do know an individual who did actually repair something on his car computer control box. It was a failed relay driver transistor. But a Cosworth Vega would certainly be a puzzlement for the good-old-boys, who could probably have fixed the four-barrel carb in just a few minutes. Of course, those automotive computers are not meant to be fixed, only replaced. The under hood ones are encapsulated, mostly. Even if you could get into it and find out which part was bad it would still not be possible to get a replacement part. Just pay $600 or so for the new box and hope that was the problem because you can't return the box if it was not the problem. I agree that computers in cars is a poor choice, and will continue to be a poor choice. That is why current models have so many of them. They are a great profit source once the warranty expires.

digital_dreamer
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
digital_dreamer   4/13/2012 7:15:56 PM
NO RATINGS
Reminds me of my Volvos. Had a '69 with twin sidedraft carbs. Then, got a '72 with the Bosch electronic fuel injection. My, my. Took the panel off the control module and viewed all the transistors - no ICs. Didn't ever have any trouble with it. But, the following '74 Volvo had a CI system (Continuous Injection), which was a purely mechanical system with a damper in the intake controlling the fuel flow for each injector. Now, that system was very problematic. This was the same system in the Audis and Mercedes of the time. Never really understood why the European auto industry moved from electronic to mechanical, only to go back again. Perhaps the electronic systems were not really mature enough at the point and I was lucky to not have any trouble with mine. MAJ

nlevine
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
nlevine   4/13/2012 5:38:09 PM
NO RATINGS
When I worked at a service station in the early 80's, we just referred to those little modules under the hood as FRED - f*@&*%g ridiculous electronic device. Strictly replacement-only items, and usually by trial and error..

old account Frank Eory
User Rank
Rookie
re: The Ballad of the Cosworth Vega
old account Frank Eory   4/12/2012 11:48:26 PM
NO RATINGS
Clearly something to do with the electronic engine control system -- something almost no auto mechanic had ever seen before in the mid-70s. In those days, they probably really did repair those electronic modules -- use that "special diagnostic equipment" to determine the problem and replace fried ICs or resistors or whatever. In the early '90s I had a vehicle problem that sounds suspiciously similar to the one in this story. I was able to drive it to the dealer in limp mode. By then, any mechanic anywhere could plug into a port and read diagnostic codes -- or in my case, plug into the port and get no response at all. "Computer's bad, y'need a new one," he said. "But can't you fix this one?" I asked. "Nope, the thing comes as a whole assembly, just one part number." After paying way too much money for a "computer", and it taking him almost no time to install it, my vehicle ran like a champ. At about that time, I think I fully agreed with the last statement in the article -- putting computers in cars really DID seem like a stupid idea :)

Page 1 / 2   >   >>


EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Glen Chenier

Engineers Solve Analog/Digital Problem, Invent Creative Expletives
Glen Chenier
1 Comment
An analog engineer and a digital engineer join forces, use their respective skills, and pull a few bunnies out of a hat to troubleshoot a system with which they are completely unfamiliar. ...

Max Maxfield

What's the Best Traveling Toolkit?
Max Maxfield
13 comments
A few years ago at a family Christmas party, I won a pocket knife as part of a "Dirty Santa" game. This little scamp was a Buck 730 X-Tract. In addition to an incredibly strong and sharp ...

Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer

Future Engineers: Don’t 'Trip Up' on Your College Road Trip
Rishabh N. Mahajani, High School Senior and Future Engineer
10 comments
A future engineer shares his impressions of a recent tour of top schools and offers advice on making the most of the time-honored tradition of the college road trip.

Larry Desjardin

Engineers Should Study Finance: 5 Reasons Why
Larry Desjardin
41 comments
I'm a big proponent of engineers learning financial basics. Why? Because engineers are making decisions all the time, in multiple ways. Having a good financial understanding guides these ...

Top Comments of the Week
Flash Poll
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)