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BicycleBill
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Rookie
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
BicycleBill   4/13/2012 8:50:22 PM
NO RATINGS
Achieving an equatorial orbit from N Korea's latitude is difficult, see http://www.space.com/15228-north-korea-rocket-launch-complications.html as well as the comments to it for some insight.

Sanjib.A
User Rank
CEO
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
Sanjib.A   4/14/2012 9:33:07 AM
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Was this the first time that North Korea developed the third stage of rocket? If they have done this before then what might have gone wrong this time? Another question....is it the first time Iran and North Korea worked together?

prabhakar_deosthali
User Rank
CEO
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
prabhakar_deosthali   4/14/2012 10:20:41 AM
NO RATINGS
But as the report says they were trying to launch it in the polar orbit.

sharps_eng
User Rank
Rookie
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
sharps_eng   4/14/2012 12:24:01 PM
NO RATINGS
To me the most interesting question is, ' How do they know about the vibrations?'

Duane Benson
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Blogger
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
Duane Benson   4/15/2012 6:48:24 PM
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It sounds to me like someone was just speculating on the cause. On the other hand, it's also possible that several governments as well as a few very talented amateurs managed to capture telemetry from the rocket and have done a preliminary analysis of that data.

daleste
User Rank
CEO
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
daleste   4/15/2012 7:52:10 PM
NO RATINGS
Beside the political ramifications, it seems to me that North Korea would be better off expending their resources and energy in ways that would help their people and economy. But I guess dictators don't really care about the people.

BrianFraser
User Rank
Rookie
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
BrianFraser   4/16/2012 5:52:08 AM
NO RATINGS
They could bend it around to any orbit they wanted. See: "Responsive Coverage Using Propellantless Satellites", George E. Pollock, Joseph W. Gangestad, James M. Longuski, http://www.responsivespace.com/Papers/RS6/SESSIONS/SESSION%20II/2002_POLLOCK/2002P.pdf   Also: "New Synchronous Orbits Using the Geomagnetic Lorentz Force", Brett Streetman, Mason A. Peck (2007) http://www.spacecraftresearch.com/files/StreetmanPeck_JGCD2007.pdf

Kinnar
User Rank
CEO
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
Kinnar   4/16/2012 9:40:28 AM
NO RATINGS
Designing the rockets are always critical task, there are too many sections working together that too for only one event. One this kind of event affects a lot to the development plans of a developing country like North Korea, lets hope they will come with a better applications in Space Technology.

george.leopold
User Rank
Rookie
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
george.leopold   4/16/2012 1:15:55 PM
NO RATINGS
No, this was the third launch in the Unha series. The two previous launches also failed. For an analysis of NK-Iranian collaboration on multistage rockets, see: http://www.globalsecurity.org/wmd/world/dprk/td-2-3rd-flighttest.htm (I attempted to link to the above when I first posted the story, but the link, like the North Korean launch, failed during launch. It has been fixed in the story.)

george.leopold
User Rank
Rookie
re: Severe vibrations likely brought down N. Korean rocket
george.leopold   4/16/2012 1:24:21 PM
NO RATINGS
Max Q is well understood to occur at about 60 seconds after a launch. According to Western intelligence assets, the top of the rocket began to break up as the NK rocket passed through Max Q, even through the first (and probably second) stage continued to function as designed. Many of the Apollo astronauts commented on the intense vibrations during Saturn V launches. Alan Bean, the LM pilot on Apollo 12, said he was amazed at how bumpy the ride was: Do the engineers realize how this thing shakes, Bean recalled, because it shakes and vibrates so much more than I'd ever imagined. The difference of course is that the Saturn V held together every time. (Incidentally: Our source, Charles Vick, worked on the Saturn V program. He believes it should be taken out of mothballs and used again as the primary U.S. "heavy lifter.")

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