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old account Frank Eory
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re: Trade group survey to measure 'on-shoring' in electronics
old account Frank Eory   5/6/2012 8:25:17 PM
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These study results should be quite interesting. Keep in mind there is a big difference between U.S. companies building products that will largely be sold in the U.S. vs. those building products that will largely be sold in Asia. Don't expect much on-shoring from the latter group.

Sharon Starr
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re: Trade group survey to measure 'on-shoring' in electronics
Sharon Starr   5/4/2012 4:32:37 PM
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All electronics manufacturers in the Americas are invited to participate in IPC's new study about the impact of on-shoring. Participants will receive the complete report on the results. To take the survey by May 25, please go to www.ipc.org/on-shoring

goafrit
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Manager
re: Trade group survey to measure 'on-shoring' in electronics
goafrit   5/4/2012 1:52:36 PM
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The community colleges have become centers for IT and mobile apps. I do not think manufacturing jobs are coming to U.S. because U.S. is not even prepared for manufacturing. Until we see data and balance it out with those that are being shipped to China, we cannot make sense of this trend. But from my understanding, the skill sets today are biased for Facebook, Google, Twitter jobs than bolts and nuts in Caterpillar or John Deere.

agk
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re: Trade group survey to measure 'on-shoring' in electronics
agk   5/4/2012 9:16:52 AM
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It seems there is turn around slowly taking place. This will take at least 10 more years to fully under stand the situation.

mcgrathdylan
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Blogger
re: Trade group survey to measure 'on-shoring' in electronics
mcgrathdylan   5/4/2012 4:01:04 AM
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I don't know if wages are falling in the U.S., but I think there is ample evidence that they have been stagnant for a long time. Personally, I am looking forward to seeing the results of this survey. We've all heard about companies that moved manufacturing to China, then eventually came back because it didn't work out for logistics reasons, they didn't save as much as they thought they would, or they found the work force lacking, etc. Everyone who is afraid of the U.S. losing manufacturing altogether shouts from the rooftops when this happens. But is it really a trend? Net-net, is the U.S. actually regaining manufacturing jobs? I would need to see some data on that to be persuaded.

daleste
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CEO
re: Trade group survey to measure 'on-shoring' in electronics
daleste   5/4/2012 2:37:31 AM
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It is good that manufacturing is returning to the US, but I guess that also means that wages are falling here and rising in other countries.



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