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David1965
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re: How secure is AES against brute force attacks?
David1965   5/5/2013 1:37:06 PM
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Sorry to have forgotten to add this the way the system would work is to start with DES being used 4 times on the four input blocks then those four input blocks are fed into AES256 and finally into 4 OUTPUT blocks via the DES to complete one cycle of encryption also the system can be used in reverse.

David1965
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re: How secure is AES against brute force attacks?
David1965   5/5/2013 1:31:54 PM
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I have written an encryption/decryption system which uses Blowfish to generate the DES keys of which there are 4x blocks also I am using AES 256 as the filling to this DES sandwich algorithm which also uses cipher block chaining so would this be a better solution and resistant to hacking.

Badtz82
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re: How secure is AES against brute force attacks?
Badtz82   3/26/2013 12:37:55 AM
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Yup i belive it only a matter of time , i don't know if using big masive grid computing it maybe hapend. And i belive military have huge masive computer can make it. Or it has bean try i don't know

Forensics1
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re: How secure is AES against brute force attacks?
Forensics1   1/17/2013 4:39:04 AM
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@ MarkRC - OK, when that happens I will just go to 192, or 256 bit keys. Or, in the same time frame as you so wildly assume, perhaps the AES will also increase its complexity exponentially. One of the many other barriers you are ignoring is the problem of energy. To power such supercomputers as you theorize (and more likely that it will be a group of supercomputers like the NSA now uses) it would require about one-half of the world's current electrical energy production. And that is if you run them at normal room ambient temperatures. How will you meet the needs of the world's population if you feed every other gigawatt to a computer? As you wildly increase the computational limits you forget that everything has a cost. Be it energy, world resources, money, people, or whatever, there are limits to even a global effort. The foresight of youth is so shortsighted.

MarkRC
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re: How secure is AES against brute force attacks?
MarkRC   10/29/2012 9:52:00 PM
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That may have been true yesterday, however today the fastest computer in the world is capable of 27 quadrillion operations per second, next year it will be a quintillion, a few years later it will be sextillion... in a decade or two it will take minutes to decrypt AES 128. The real question is how long do you need to protect your information?

Mohit.arora
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re: How secure is AES against brute force attacks?
Mohit.arora   5/14/2012 12:46:44 PM
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Thanks. To be able to do anything meaningful, encryption has to be way way faster. Microsoft may doing it to support decryption of past smaller key size AES(i.e 64 bits). May be similar to what NSA came up recently setting up huge facility with army of super-computers to reduce decryption time. http://www.forbes.com/sites/andygreenberg/2012/03/16/nsas-new-data-center-and-ultra-fast-supercomputer-aim-to-crack-worlds-strongest-crypto/ Now what is being suspected is NSA may have been recording past encrypted data since long and now it may help recover data that was previously encrypted by 64 bit AES or less. At the end, i agree it a matter of time...

Luis Sanchez
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re: How secure is AES against brute force attacks?
Luis Sanchez   5/14/2012 6:45:03 AM
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This is quite interesting! This article is talking about a brute force attack, however there can be other kind of attacks. more sophisticated and with higher complexity algorithms. Like the next link http://www.computerworld.com/s/article/9219297/AES_proved_vulnerable_by_Microsoft_researchers belongs to an article in which a pair of scientists doing research in Microsoft facilities discovered a way to crack the AES encryption 3 to 5 times faster. Still this seems to be actually hypothetical since even so, they'd need still billions of years to actually decode the key. However all this makes us realize that is a thing of time and the progress of technology. Today's supercomputer's power will become tomorrow's laptop's power.

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