Embedded Systems Conference
Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
krisi
User Rank
Author
re: AT&T, Q’comm start next battle of home nets
krisi   5/14/2012 2:06:48 PM
NO RATINGS
To @chanj, I entirely agree...I wasn't implying that Apple should be getting into home automation business and integrated everything, that would be insane...I was just trying to make the point that that since there are several, if not hundreds, of companies supplying various pieces of the home automation puzzle that it will be very difficult, if not impossible, to make it work smoothly...it is so much easier to make it happen in a car or in a computer alone (although even my PC crashes or hangs up quite regularly)...Kris

DrQuine
User Rank
Author
re: AT&T, Q’comm start next battle of home nets
DrQuine   5/14/2012 2:29:21 AM
NO RATINGS
Why should consumers bother with Xanboo, Insteon, Zigbee and ZWave systems when they already have WiFi and Internet capabilities? Shouldn't vendors simply make devices that connect as IP devices to the legacy networks we already use? Do we really want to be buying appliances and risking another VHS / Betamax debacle?

chanj0
User Rank
Author
re: AT&T, Q’comm start next battle of home nets
chanj0   5/13/2012 11:17:42 PM
NO RATINGS
In order to have home automation to be a achievable project, various standards have to be properly built. Gadgets have to be developed accordingly and there shall have various vendors be the suppliers. People may want a LG refrigerators, a Samsung washer and dryers, a Sony TV, Honeywell themostat. A family member may want an Apple iPhone while another may want a Nokia Lumia or Android. Last but not least, the confidence that these gadgets work. It takes time and effort to make it real. I don't believe Apple alone can make it happen. No company has ever been almighty. That's why teamwork is so important. That's how a society is built.

krisi
User Rank
Author
re: AT&T, Q’comm start next battle of home nets
krisi   5/9/2012 3:32:24 AM
NO RATINGS
thank you @PJames for your perspective...I am pretty sure people will want to control their thermostats thru their smartphones etc so the issues will come up...I believe I am reasonably educated user of electronics but I already have issues hooking up everything I have at home to work...my laser printer doesn't work with the computer I bought (HP no longer supports that driver), all my remotes are messed up, I have some IP address conflicts with my wireless devices, etc...I already work as a local IT support guy for my family, free of charge without any desire to do so and I really don't want to learn on how to do embedded system design when my refrigerator starts heating up and my thermostat decides to freeze me in the winter ;-)...Kris

PJames
User Rank
Author
re: AT&T, Q’comm start next battle of home nets
PJames   5/9/2012 12:56:08 AM
NO RATINGS
That is probably an overly pessimistic view. A properly designed embedded controller in an appliance, even if adding networking and sophisticated configuration options, need not be buggy. A majority of consumer dissatisfaction with devices that crash is based upon platforms which are routinely extended with software, apps and even malware, from a multiplicity of sources, where interactions are never tested. If we end up with thermostats that are downloading Java scripts and refrigerators onto which we are loading apps, then we will undoubtedly be adding headache to our lives.

krisi
User Rank
Author
re: AT&T, Q’comm start next battle of home nets
krisi   5/8/2012 2:50:05 PM
NO RATINGS
I am somewhat skeptical whether people will use these systems and start automating their home environment. Unless all gadgets are designed by Apple this heterogeneous integration of devices from different vendors will not work well and you will have to re-boot your system at least once a day...Kris



Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST
As data rates begin to move beyond 25 Gbps channels, new problems arise. Getting to 50 Gbps channels might not be possible with the traditional NRZ (2-level) signaling. PAM4 lets data rates double with only a small increase in channel bandwidth by sending two bits per symbol. But, it brings new measurement and analysis problems. Signal integrity sage Ransom Stephens will explain how PAM4 differs from NRZ and what to expect in design, measurement, and signal analysis.

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Most Recent Comments
Clive
 
Clive
 
Max The Magnificent
 
randy112
 
dt_hayden
 
dt_hayden
 
ckachris
 
HardwIntr
 
IJD
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...
The LTC®3886 is a dual PolyPhase DC/DC synchronous ...
The LTC®2348-18 is an 18-bit, low noise 8-channel ...
The LT®3042 is a high performance low dropout linear ...
Chwan-Jye Foo (C.J Foo), product marketing manager for ...
The LT®3752/LT3752-1 are current mode PWM controllers ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
Active balancing of series connected battery stacks exists ...
After a four-year absence, Infineon returns to Mobile World ...
A laptop’s 65-watt adapter can be made 6 times smaller and ...
An industry network should have device and data security at ...
The LTC2975 is a four-channel PMBus Power System Manager ...
In this video, a new high speed CMOS output comparator ...
The LT8640 is a 42V, 5A synchronous step-down regulator ...
The LTC2000 high-speed DAC has low noise and excellent ...
How do you protect the load and ensure output continues to ...