Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Fabio007
User Rank
Rookie
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
Fabio007   11/21/2012 9:43:09 AM
NO RATINGS
"More haste, less speed." "Months of coding can save hours of planning.". Yes, I have seen contract programmers display both of the above. They write code, do some testing, get paid, then move on. Management pats itself on the back thinking the jobs done. Only later when a new software feature has to be added that the true nature of the beast is revealed. Suddenly it becomes clear that coding and documentation standards were not followed. Management was too hasty in accepting the "product", or the person allocated the task of checking "product compliance" was not up to the task, or was put under extreme pressure not to hold the project up. The software contract has no clause for redress. The original coder is no where to be found. But that is months down the track, and becomes somebody else's problem... usually mine.

seaEE
User Rank
CEO
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
seaEE   10/11/2012 4:08:03 AM
NO RATINGS
"Measure twice, cut once." The problem is, if you measure twice, people think you are wasting time.

MarvA
User Rank
Rookie
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
MarvA   10/11/2012 12:34:32 AM
NO RATINGS
Don't I know it? A lot of the work that I do is troubleshooting serious design problems in different systems. It has to be right because of the usual critical nature of the issues. My real projects get delayed but no one pushes me. I got to be the slowest designer in the company but stuff works when I'm done.

Duane Benson
User Rank
Blogger
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
Duane Benson   6/5/2012 4:21:08 PM
NO RATINGS
It almost seems like even the people at Microsoft designing the Windows libraries forget that some task already has a library function written and just write a new one. Or maybe, it's just easier to create a new one than update an old one and go through all of the compatibility testing that would be required.

masher
User Rank
Rookie
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
masher   6/4/2012 5:09:51 PM
NO RATINGS
I had a junior engineer wait a month until he had the latest and greatest RF design software before he would even attempt a prototype design of a new power am design. He wanted to do a harmonic balance along with several other competing analysis before he would even attemp a bench prototype. The only software we had was an older RF package that was simple, easy to use and plain worked, albeit with a bit of bench tweaking to fine tune the circuit but it never let us down. It was the minimal tweaking on the bench that this new grad wanted to eliminate and bench tweaking was out of the question, His thought was push a button and have a working design come out the other end without any knowledge of what could go wrong which you only obtain from actaul bench experience. Unfortunately when you spend 60 thousand dollars to replace your existing EDA software and the new software requires a couple of months to learn how to use, you also loose valuable time in which competitors get their product to market. You can train a pilot to take off and land in a simulator but you sure as heck are not going to give him or her a pilots license to fly a commercial airliner until they take the seat of something simple and basic to start out on.

Les_Slater
User Rank
CEO
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
Les_Slater   5/30/2012 3:24:58 PM
NO RATINGS
We need a formality in which a problem or task is completely defined and the tools that go from that definition to the executable.

sudo
User Rank
Rookie
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
sudo   5/28/2012 8:51:04 AM
NO RATINGS
Bill, are you describing SCRUM design methodology? Oh, that's Schwaber, not Schweber! ;-) Good point and this is not just a time issue, either. I admit, I sometimes embrace the dark side and I just tweak and throw the code at the FPGA compiler, again. This only works though if the basic architecture is sound and it's a double-edged sword if this is meant to save time. What if there is another error behind the error? And one behind that? Time to stop and think! If I jump in without proper thinking upfront and hope to do the checks later, the architecture will resemble the proverbial dog's breakfast and when finally the design appears to work, then the obvious temptation is not to look too hard for possible errors still hiding, especially with increasing time pressures on the project. It's just human nature.

seaEE
User Rank
CEO
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
seaEE   5/27/2012 2:15:47 AM
NO RATINGS
The person sitting in front of their computer appearing to be doing nothing may actually be thinking about how to solve a problem or how to best organize a process. On the other hand, the person frantically hacking away at their keyboard may be making a host of mistakes and bad, quick decisions that will affect a product for a long time down the road.

DickH
User Rank
Rookie
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
DickH   5/27/2012 1:38:20 AM
NO RATINGS
that's what a lot of folks say about C++ - you get 'choice/decision paralysis' because there are to many ways to code something - and it's not at all obvious which will be best. A great language would point obviously towards the best approach

psw_#1
User Rank
Rookie
re: Can advanced tools actually slow us down?
psw_#1   5/25/2012 9:15:08 PM
NO RATINGS
The long-short way to the door, versus the short-long way... Event driven and schedule aware, not schedule driven... Plan the plan, execute the plan...

Page 1 / 2   >   >>


EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Creating New Faceplates for Antique Analog Meters
Max Maxfield
40 comments
I've currently got a couple of hobby projects on the go that feature the use of antique analog meters. For example, there's my Inamorata Prognostication Engine and its companion, the ...

EDN Staff

11 Summer Vacation Spots for Engineers
EDN Staff
11 comments
This collection of places from technology history, museums, and modern marvels is a roadmap for an engineering adventure that will take you around the world. Here are just a few spots ...

Glen Chenier

Engineers Solve Analog/Digital Problem, Invent Creative Expletives
Glen Chenier
11 comments
- An analog engineer and a digital engineer join forces, use their respective skills, and pull a few bunnies out of a hat to troubleshoot a system with which they are completely ...

Larry Desjardin

Engineers Should Study Finance: 5 Reasons Why
Larry Desjardin
45 comments
I'm a big proponent of engineers learning financial basics. Why? Because engineers are making decisions all the time, in multiple ways. Having a good financial understanding guides these ...

Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)