Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
Page 1 / 2   >   >>
Luis Sanchez
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
Luis Sanchez   7/21/2012 11:18:55 PM
NO RATINGS
Interesting. I thought the same... this is too much electronics power for the task but... it's good to use what is at your hand and it's a good way to learn how to use it. And also... this will grow right? Let's see how this evolves. Turn on the TV, and the like. And put an intercom on the outside of your home and connect it to a Voice over IP client and then to the internet so that you can receive a call whenever someone pushes your intercom button and answer and make them believe you're there. Of course you would answer but then sent them away right? :) keep up the good engineering work!

Jim Horn
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
Jim Horn   7/17/2012 12:41:12 AM
NO RATINGS
electryk321 - As the article states, he already had the Spartan kit. What better way to become familiar with it than a "real world" application? This isn't a production design. Engineering is making things with what you have. An already paid for and in hand solution is cheaper than buying a 39 cent processor and ginning up the circuitry, power supply, I/O and such for it, yes? I've used a $12000 workstation to weigh airplanes - a horrible price mismatch - because I already had it. Results were pretty darn good too (still used in FAA and EAA reference documents). Kudos to Robin for a fine article and clear documentation!

jackanom
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
jackanom   7/15/2012 3:43:06 PM
NO RATINGS
Probably 50MHz is nearly minimum, as long as he uses MicroBlaze and Linux

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
Max The Magnificent   7/13/2012 1:16:28 PM
NO RATINGS
With regard to counting fishes, this is just a wild and wacky hobby project -- not a commercial venture

elektryk321
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
elektryk321   7/13/2012 8:17:37 AM
NO RATINGS
Of course you can use FPGA to count fishes (or track their movement) with camera. The complexity of this task probablu will require to use FPGA or fast processor. If you have a benefit of such work why should I say to stop doing this? I just point this project should be designed in another way. In the text I do not see arguments why FPGA was choosen. If it was a "school project" selecting FPGA make a sense, for instalation in real house IMHO not.

elektryk321
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
elektryk321   7/13/2012 8:06:20 AM
NO RATINGS
Good engineering practice is to scale resources to task. What will be next? Use supercomputer to blink LED? If you want to add USB and video processing core, I doubt if Spartan-3E will have enought resources. Probably you should use some chip from Virtex family, or just take some embedded computer (or PC).

elektryk321
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
elektryk321   7/13/2012 8:00:59 AM
NO RATINGS
Just answer for my question, what feature in this project require 50MHz FPGA?

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
Max The Magnificent   6/8/2012 1:58:50 PM
NO RATINGS
@Elektryk: The thing is that when you have a project in mind, this helps you learn the hardware. I want to make a random-number generator using a camera pointing at a fish tank and using an FPGA to count the number of scales on however many fish are in view at any one time. Next you will be telling me that this is a waste of my time (Ha!)

Max The Magnificent
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
Max The Magnificent   6/8/2012 1:56:05 PM
NO RATINGS
Now a laser bug zapper would really be of interest!!!

rfindley
User Rank
Author
re: FPGA-based vacation light controller
rfindley   6/8/2012 7:52:05 AM
NO RATINGS
Elektryk, I personally think the idea of killing bugs with artillery sounds like a lot of fun. After I've mastered the 'bugs', I would naturally want to see what else I can do with my artillery. With the Spartan-3E dev kit, I could add a USB camera and video processing core to watch for bugs, and target them autonomously.

Page 1 / 2   >   >>


Radio
LATEST ARCHIVED BROADCAST

What are the engineering and design challenges in creating successful IoT devices? These devices are usually small, resource-constrained electronics designed to sense, collect, send, and/or interpret data. Some of the devices need to be smart enough to act upon data in real time, 24/7. Specifically the guests will discuss sensors, security, and lessons from IoT deployments.

Brought to you by:

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)
Most Recent Comments
Bruzzer
 
sranje
 
GSKrasle
 
resistion
 
resistion
 
elizabethsimon
 
Max The Magnificent
 
Bruzzer
 
David_Ashton_EC
Like Us on Facebook
Special Video Section
LEDs are being used in current luxury model automotive ...
With design sizes expected to increase by 5X through 2020, ...
01:48
Linear Technology’s LT8330 and LT8331, two Low Quiescent ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
LED lighting is an important feature in today’s and future ...
05:27
The LT8602 has two high voltage buck regulators with an ...
05:18
Silego Technology’s highly versatile Mixed-signal GreenPAK ...
The quality and reliability of Mill-Max's two-piece ...
01:34
Why the multicopter? It has every thing in it. 58 of ...
Security is important in all parts of the IoT chain, ...
Infineon explains their philosophy and why the multicopter ...
The LTC4282 Hot SwapTM controller allows a board to be ...
This video highlights the Zynq® UltraScale+™ MPSoC, and sho...
Homeowners may soon be able to store the energy generated ...
The LTC®6363 is a low power, low noise, fully differential ...
See the Virtex® UltraScale+™ FPGA with 32.75G backplane ...
Vincent Ching, applications engineer at Avago Technologies, ...
The LT®6375 is a unity-gain difference amplifier which ...
The LTC®4015 is a complete synchronous buck controller/ ...
10:35
The LTC®2983 measures a wide variety of temperature sensors ...