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Peter Clarke
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re: AMD looks smart in the brain engineering era
Peter Clarke   6/18/2012 10:18:14 AM
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@Wobbly My take on that is...you are right they are HSA....BUT they are not as generalized or as complex as HSA will become.

t.alex
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re: AMD looks smart in the brain engineering era
t.alex   6/17/2012 1:17:04 PM
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Huge software headache..

Goffers
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re: AMD looks smart in the brain engineering era
Goffers   6/14/2012 8:19:27 AM
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Presumably the presence of a Cortex-A5 will be more than is necessary just to support Trust Zone, leaving some potential head room for ARM code applications already built in.

Wobbly
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re: AMD looks smart in the brain engineering era
Wobbly   6/13/2012 9:55:33 PM
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Many Smartphone chips are already 'HSA' with a compliment of high speed 32 bit Application processors, multi-thread DSP, video acceleration, low speed 32 bit management processors, vector engines for the modems, acceleration blocks for cryptographic functions, HD video, audio, plus embedded power and clock management. If that isn't HSA, I am not sure what is.

DMcCunney
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re: AMD looks smart in the brain engineering era
DMcCunney   6/13/2012 8:09:16 PM
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I'm actually a bit surprised this hasn't happened before. AMD currently makes Intel X86 compatible CPUs. but there's no reason they shouldn't make CPUs with ARM cores. (Intel used to, in the Strongarm division they originally got from DEC sold to Marvell.) And AMD won't have any "not invented here" issues with doing so. AMD makes and sells chips, and ARM processors are poised to make a run at markets AMD is active in, so being able to offer X86 and ARM solutions is a compelling vision.

Hephaestus
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re: AMD looks smart in the brain engineering era
Hephaestus   6/13/2012 6:04:31 PM
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That's one small step for a company...one giant leap towards the technological singularity...

Les_Slater
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CEO
re: AMD looks smart in the brain engineering era
Les_Slater   6/13/2012 5:41:55 PM
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"Even if some of them DO share the vision, commercial competitiveness may persuade them NOT to join HSA on the grounds that differentiation is achieved by working separately or in a different group. Market pressures sometimes do that to technology." This is part of the problem. The other which is inferred by the success of Intel in the PC business. In the short term it is very compelling not to compete with yourself.



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