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Max The Magnificent
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
Max The Magnificent   9/30/2013 12:13:11 PM
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@kiranvarma: i have to get this book

My problem is lack of time ... I have so many books I want to read and so many things I want to do ... but not enough time to do everything (sob sob)

kiranvarma_npeducations
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
kiranvarma_npeducations   9/28/2013 2:32:27 AM
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i have to get this book - npeducations

Max The Magnificent
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
Max The Magnificent   7/18/2012 3:31:43 PM
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I have this book sitting in one of the "waiting to be read" piles on my office floor...

rpcy
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
rpcy   7/18/2012 3:23:13 PM
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Read the book One Second After for a truly chilling look at a plausible scenario for exactly this.

przemek0
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
przemek0   7/10/2012 5:05:20 PM
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The situation with micro-controllers today reminds me of electric motors 100 years ago. They started as an expensive novelty of which you would have one per factory floor, and ended up ubiquitous and cheap everywhere. Just like counting microcontrollers, you could amuse yourself by counting motors around you: wristwatch, cellphone (buzzer motor), one or two in each disk drive, door locks, windows, timers, etc. etc.

przemek0
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
przemek0   7/10/2012 4:59:53 PM
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It makes sense: wiring is expensive to make and install, and fault-prone: for instance, a squirrel chewed through half of the wires in my main engine harness. It's cheaper and more reliable to run a serial connection everywhere (power, ground, data), implying a communication and execution nodes all over the place, including doors, windows and mirrors. I read that some companies began using microcontrollers instead of timed fuses in individual firecrackers now.

sanjaac
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
sanjaac   7/5/2012 12:59:20 PM
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For a quick look at the sub-categories in automotive from the leader: http://www.renesas.eu/applications/automotive/index.jsp

Paul A. Clayton
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
Paul A. Clayton   7/4/2012 1:48:28 AM
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GPUs do not really have that many cores. The "core" count is inflated by counting each SIMD/vector lane as a separate core. NVIDIA's terminology uses "Streaming Multiprocessor" for what I would call a core, and the Fermi GPUs provided 32 "CUDA cores" per "Streaming Multiprocessor" (with up to 16 SMs on a chip). GPUs also use multithreading, which might be viewed as virtual cores, further increasing the number of contexts available. (Intel's SMT/hyperthreading does present threads as virtual processors. MIPS' MT ASE distinguishes between Thread Contexts and Virtual Processor Elements.) (You might guess that I like reading about computer architecture!)

Max The Magnificent
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2012 1:19:53 PM
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Actually disk drives typically have at least a couple of processors as I recall. Re GPUs, some of these can have ~1000 cores ... but I tend to think of these as being separate beasts :-)

Max The Magnificent
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re: Microcontroller Invasion!
Max The Magnificent   7/3/2012 1:17:44 PM
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Fortunately you just mentioned them :-)

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