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chanj0
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CEO
re: Whatever happened to evolvable hardware?
chanj0   7/16/2012 4:05:38 PM
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An evolvable hardware seems like a fantastic idea. Yet, it can be scary. A hardware is able to change itself to fit the environment seems like a mimic of human. With the help of neural network from the software world, an intelligent being made of metal and plastic will soon be built. Nonetheless, moving forward is an inevitable event. We just need to learn along the way and, be cautious and responsible of what we do.

Duane Benson
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Blogger
re: Whatever happened to evolvable hardware?
Duane Benson   7/16/2012 2:30:54 PM
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I think Erebus is on the right track in terms of what happened with this. Conventional hardware has just advanced so rapidly that the need to adapt to newer and faster processors has kept ahead of the need to optimize. At some point, hardware may very well become so complex as to be unmanageable by humans. These advances may very well slow or stop and then optimization will be top priority. At that point, techniques like self-evolveable hardware will become viable and possibly even necessary.

Peter Clarke
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re: Whatever happened to evolvable hardware?
Peter Clarke   7/16/2012 9:08:15 AM
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A "Friday-evening" glitch corrupted an earlier version of this article....caused by photo disappear, which i sure people would say was no great loss.. But i ended up reposting.

DrQuine
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CEO
re: Whatever happened to evolvable hardware?
DrQuine   7/15/2012 9:54:47 PM
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(there are three copies of this posting - all the comments will need to be merged into the final permanent version)

KB3001
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CEO
re: Whatever happened to evolvable hardware?
KB3001   7/14/2012 9:39:06 AM
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Whatever happened to all the posts that were here before? ;-)

EREBUS0
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Rookie
re: Whatever happened to evolvable hardware?
EREBUS0   7/13/2012 7:38:27 PM
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I think the whole concept just was overcome by events. Regardless of the versatility of your evolvable technology, it just could not compete with the pace of standard component improvements. Look at the power you get each year and then think about holding hardware for five or ten years. It just doesn't make any sense and it is clearly not cost effective. It's like reuseable software. It's a great idea, but few people do it because of the rapid changes in language options and extensions. Just my opinion.



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