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fmotta
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
fmotta   7/17/2012 10:26:43 PM
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Few Americans know of the largest Android phone (I think) in current history. The original Samsung Galaxy Tab 7 was 7" a cell phone and a tablet. I was making cell calls on this Eclair (or was it Froyo) based 7" GSM phone/tablet quite some time ago. This was out long before Apple created the larger "Note"-like product and obviously was before the Note itself.

SPLatMan
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
SPLatMan   7/17/2012 10:12:20 PM
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Yes! I want one! Perfect solution to my dilemma of working at home some days, in the office other days. One superphone, two docking stations each with triple monitors.

selinz
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
selinz   7/17/2012 8:43:57 PM
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I want the biggest thing that can fit in my shirt pocket. Well, and it shoudl do everything too. Unfortunately, my 16" laptop doesn't quite fit. But my currently 4.3" Android does. And there are very few things that current smart phones cannot do that are needed in mobile environments. The first thing I do for my kids' phones is to buy them "guppy batteries." So much for the thinness. But it makes all day possible with heavy video, web, and text use.

CC VanDorne
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
CC VanDorne   7/17/2012 8:21:49 PM
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Now that's a good chuckle, right there.

old account Frank Eory
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
old account Frank Eory   7/17/2012 7:37:42 PM
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Very true. When my wife got her first Android phone a few years ago -- a Moto Droid X -- I was stunned at how big it was. She said something like "too bad you don't carry a purse or you could get one of these too." That's when it first dawned on me that some smartphones -- at least in the U.S. where few men carry purses -- are inadvertently more targeted at women than at men. I say inadvertently because I doubt the manufacturer intended for that gender-specific targeting. But for many men, some phones are just too big to be comfortably carried in a front pocket, and as you said, women don't have that same issue.

DMcCunney
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
DMcCunney   7/17/2012 7:27:33 PM
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I'm fascinated. My prior take had been that I wasn't interested in a "converged" device because I simply needed a larger screen than a practical phone would have. My ideal would have been a combo tablet and phone, each of which would work independently, but they would work together if present. (Like the tablet using the phone as a cellular modem if wifi wasn't available.) My current cellphone is the smallest, lightest feature phone Nokia makes. It's not a smartphone, and not intended to be. All it does is make calls and do SMS, and that's all I want it to do. New devices are redefining what a practical phone is. "Pocket sized" isn't an issue, because I don't *carry* devices like that in a pocket. My cell phone has a clip on belt-holster with a velcro fastener on the retaining strap. Anything else gets carried in a backpack or manpurse, and I always have one or the other with me. With things like bluetooth headsets, I'm not looking at holding a tablet to my ear when I'm making calls with the newer devices. Someone elsewhere made a point I'd been thinking about for a while. The electronics are getting small, fast, and cheap enough that your phone might *be* your principal computing device. Every phone down the road is likely to be a smartphone simply because it *can* be. The device of the future might be a pocket computer, that you carry and use like a tablet or phone when traveling. When you aren't traveling, you plug it onto a docking station with A/C power, full sized keyboard, mouse, and big monitor, and connection to other peripherals like external storage and routers through your home network. We may just be looking at a scenario where desktops and laptops largely cease to exist.

bolaji.ojo
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
bolaji.ojo   7/17/2012 7:19:58 PM
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I am beginning to feel like I didn't quite get it all upside down. Apple is beatable and whether it is Samsung or some other company that's doing it, this was inevitable. It had a good lead and it used it advantageously but when you've got so many guns trained on you, even a flesh wound can start a feeding frenzy. The next shoe will drop soon and that's the one that falls off when many of today's young folks start thinking of the i-anything as their fathers' stuff! Sure, they like the iPhone/iPad/iPod now, but they also like Facebook and one day, it won't be so cool to whip out any of these stuff. Differentiation tends to win out eventually and that's Apple's Achilles heel.

kathleen.maher
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
kathleen.maher   7/17/2012 7:16:28 PM
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I can't help put point out that most of us holding up the other half of the sky, ahem, women, do not have the pockets problem since we generally carry bags and may more likely have roomier pockets.

Andre BRAZ
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
Andre BRAZ   7/17/2012 7:10:00 PM
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I really prefer big screens... Better for daily use.

scanman
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
scanman   7/17/2012 6:36:20 PM
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Every one talks about the "Note". I bought one recently. Fantastic display, no comparison to iPhone. But, the battery drainage, that's a different story. Samsung should put more effort on reducing the leakage ( display and Android consume almost half or the power whether in use or not)

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