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Stanley_
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
Stanley_   7/18/2012 3:43:24 PM
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Samsung is a vertically intergrated, but Apple is not. Samsung doen't need to worry about contract or volume prediction when make new phone, but Apple has to, which limit them how many phone they can make per year. Outsourcing manufacturing now bite back...

Duane Benson
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
Duane Benson   7/18/2012 3:38:33 PM
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I find it ironic that for years, phones kept getting smaller and smaller. The best ones were the smallest, yet now the trend has reversed. I had been hoping for watch phones and a bluetooth headset. Of course, a watch phone wouldn't do double duty as a GPS.

rick merritt
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
rick merritt   7/18/2012 2:55:50 PM
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Tell me more about this Linux variant

rick merritt
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
rick merritt   7/18/2012 2:53:06 PM
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HTC has clearly broken out of this mold with its HTC Sense software.

rick merritt
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
rick merritt   7/18/2012 2:51:34 PM
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Great point! Samsung not only has the leverage of being a leading source of flash chips and displays. It also has strong process technology and a solid mobile apps processor business now strengthened with the addition of Bluetooth and GPS from its CSR acquisition.

anon3860072
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
anon3860072   7/18/2012 1:59:15 PM
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Didn't you notice that the 4-core Cortex-A9 from Samsung use PMIC with up to 27 LDOs? This is probably why the battery is depleted so quickly!

anon3860072
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
anon3860072   7/18/2012 1:56:24 PM
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Beating Apple is both easy and difficult. Even the 300 warriors lost to the Persian armies. The Sun always go down. I am surprised why none of Apple's competition play the "partners" game. OEMs like Asus / Acer / HP, despite of lip-singing on "system", are mostly trying to keep the manufacturing cost down. None is willing to spend the time and the money to build partnership with others to offer "solutions" to consumers. Instead, they have been offering largely "cheap" hardware. Sony should be the one that can easily beat Apple hands-down. Reality is the other way round!

anon3860072
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
anon3860072   7/18/2012 1:50:01 PM
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You should probably say "Steve Jobs missed the boat" because he defined Apple, not the other way round. Steve always hold his own opinion of how things should be. Did he tell everybody that consumers didn't know how to hold the iPhone4 in defense of the bad antenna design? Still, consumers were willing to accept the accusation and kept buying millions of iPhone4? In Apple history, it never had the experience of managing multiple SKUs. Regardless, Apples has over 100B of cash, so let's see what it plans to spends on next.

anon3860072
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
anon3860072   7/18/2012 1:44:18 PM
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Be realistic and be practical, your personal perference and physical condition and your taste for clothings do not mean "iPhone have the best form factor ...". Consumers all have different preferences. Though many consumers in the last two years were blindsighted by anything with "i", they eventually wake up and start looking around for better choices. iPhone offers limited choices because it is what Steve Jobs felt for the consumers, not what the consumers may actually want. Wake up, be open-minded!

DickQuill
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
DickQuill   7/18/2012 8:58:12 AM
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S3 fits into most shirt pockets

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