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gpty
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
gpty   7/19/2012 2:14:24 AM
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Did you think that it is not the matter of the form factor of the phone indeed? Why Galaxy sell better in Asia? It is because we DO NOT LIKE iTunes! You may be surprise of that if you are in US. If you ask 10 people who has used iphone in Hong Kong, I bet 9 of them tell you they don't like iTunes. Most of us use Windows, the synchronization is tooooo slow, it takes 1 or 2 hours! Also we think that the operation in iTunes is misleading. Most of us has an experience that we deleted something in iphone just because we clicked the wrong button! I am an engineer and even I have to be very careful in the synchronization, so what do you think for an ordinary people? I can tell you most of us here using iphone is considering to change to other smartphone.

gpty
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
gpty   7/19/2012 1:56:34 AM
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I am in Hong Kong, I realized that people here have been "trained" do not need to use the handging strap! Actually it is too crownded here and you have no chance to reach the strap.

gpty
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
gpty   7/19/2012 1:40:36 AM
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The ultimate way is a smaller phone with a bigger screen. How? A foldable screen.

gpty
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
gpty   7/19/2012 1:37:16 AM
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It may be true in the old day, but it is not nowadays. I am in Hong Kong. Basically every young people in Hong Konw own "at least" one smartphone, many of them has two, some own iphone, ipad and Galaxy...so it is no more a status symbol, it is too common.

Stanley_
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
Stanley_   7/18/2012 10:47:00 PM
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if Apple is making one phone a year purely intentionally without any potential supply chain issue, then the decision maker(s) now and will see the consequence.

KRagh
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
KRagh   7/18/2012 7:49:10 PM
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When the handset market was developing, smaller meant better. It reached a point when world's smallest phone could easily slip into a lady's hand pouch, and would be lost in men's shirt pocket. Only youngsters with nimble fingers could an SMS message on it. Then came the reality check. If it is too difficult to even dial using our forefinger then there is a problem. The logic applies to every smart-phone as well. While typing if everyone starts getting unitended alphabets, then keyboard is too small. The human factor equation is based on the weakest link -fairly fat fingers of people, who lack the skill to twist and turn their fingers to adapt to a small key pad. This should be considered the practical limit in terms of design, not whether it is possible to manufacture something smaller. Of course, keyboard that can be seen only on a microscope can be manufactured, but of what use is it? In that sense, I think Samsung got it. In terms of operating system, while the argument continues, reports today confirmed that well over 55% of smart phones operate on Android and that number is growing. An open interface is proving its edge once more.

DMcCunney
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
DMcCunney   7/18/2012 4:54:50 PM
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Yep. And a lot of what I think is "apples to oranges" comparisons (sic) when talking about it. I don't think you can realistically talk about iOS market share vs Android market share, when Android's share is split amongst so many manufacturers and devices. The iPhone is the single largest selling phone, and any other phone manufacture would *kill* to have a fraction of the iPhone's sales for any of their models. Apple doesn't care about market share, and doesn't have to. It has revenues and profits that dwarf everyone else.

DMcCunney
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
DMcCunney   7/18/2012 4:50:44 PM
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Apple is the 800 lb gorilla in the market. They don't need to make their own components. Their orders are big enough that you may assume vendors will give Apple what it wants *first*, and then worry about parceling remaining stocks to other customers. If Apple has had any supply chain problems with being unable to build products because it couldn't get components, I haven't heard about them.

DMcCunney
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
DMcCunney   7/18/2012 4:36:27 PM
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@Rick: Its Aboriginal Linux, at http://landley.net/aboriginal/ There's a companion effort called Toybox, intended to replace most of the Gnu utilities bundled with Linux distros with much smaller versions. (The goal of Toybox is that the whole set will fit in an executable under 1MB in size.) Toybox was begin by a chap who had been the principal maintainer of Busybox. (http://www.busybox.net/) Busybox is a set of cut down Gnu utilities packaged as a single executable, and installed with symlinks, so that "ls", for example, resolves to "busybox ls [args]". The Puppy Linux distro uses Busybox to achieve small size, as does DSL and TinyCore Linux, and my older wireless router used replacement firmware with Busybox, so I could ssh to a command line in my router and run vi to edit config files. Toybox can be built as a monolithic executable or as each tool as a separate program, depending on what you want to do. But I misspoke earlier: I don't think Aboriginal is intended to let you rebuild it on a a smartphone - it's intended to make it easier to rebuild something you can *run* on a smartphone. As the site says, "We cross-compile so you don't have to." With a powerful enough smartphone, you might be able to rebuild the Linux kernel *on* the phone, but you might not want to take the time it would require to do it.

PGrayDS
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re: How Samsung stole Apple’s lead
PGrayDS   7/18/2012 4:17:41 PM
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So that just leaves the question as to who is taking all the profits in the market...the last info I know was that Apple was taking 80% of the profits. There is a big difference between being No1 in sales and No1 in profits!

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