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anon9303122
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
anon9303122   7/17/2012 7:14:47 PM
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Or put a filament and a plate at one end . . .

tb1
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
tb1   7/17/2012 6:53:19 PM
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"OOPS, what if the is a small problem problem while YOU are mid-way under the Atlantic..." That was my thought. Every idea looks good as long as you don't consider what can go wrong. It is hard to imagine anything worse than to be stuck thousands of miles away from land, under the ocean, in a vacuum tube.

old account Frank Eory
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
old account Frank Eory   7/17/2012 6:02:05 PM
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A full working system up and running within a decade? Right, because the planet has infinite financial resources to fund such an adventure. "space travel on earth" seems like an appropriate description. All the costs (and more) and all the safety risks of space travel -- just to save a few hours relative to an old-fashioned jet aircraft.

S.Gilden
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
S.Gilden   7/17/2012 4:02:02 PM
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OOPS, what if the is a small problem problem while YOU are mid-way under the Atlantic... perhaps a minor vacume leak, or a power outage at the vaccum source... or an electrial outage on the levatation system... hum, maybe you also consider the use of a straight shot frictionless "tube flight" system that claims to get you anywhere in the world in 44 minutes ?? from 2-A PRESS, Binghamton, N. Y. Thurs., March 24,1966 'Tube' Research Rensselaer —UP)— Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute plans a $70,000 research facility, Project Tube Flight, to study the feasibility of high speed, aboveground tubes for mass transportation. The U. S. Commerce Department granted the contract for the work.

KB3001
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
KB3001   7/17/2012 3:23:48 PM
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"They used pneumatic pressure to zip letters along. " These systems are still used in banks/supermarkets nowadays to transfer cash, no?

Hasmon
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Hasmon   7/17/2012 2:36:09 PM
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Why not use this within cities for high-speed package delivery...like they used to have in Paris 100 years ago? They used pneumatic pressure to zip letters along. This could be used to replace couriers, and it would be a lot safer delivering packages than trying it out on humans. It might even enable a proper e-commerce system...Imagine getting deliveries from amazon in an instant...actually wait--4000 mph is still too slow to cross the continent in less than one hour... For people, a tube built through the oceans would be the safest solution...earthquake proof and relatively safe from human interference. It could float a few dozen metres below the surface.

NewYankEE
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
NewYankEE   7/17/2012 12:34:21 PM
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I'd be happy with a waterslide commute to work this morning ;-)

KB3001
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
KB3001   7/17/2012 11:27:05 AM
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Not going to happen across the atlantic (the cost is astronomical). Perhaps within continents...

MikeSB
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
MikeSB   7/17/2012 11:16:08 AM
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This is obviously completely implausible. London's current Crossrail project is costing £1.5bn for 21km of tunnels. For a 4000 mile trans-Atlantic tunnel, that scales to £460bn ($720bn), and that doesn't even include making the tunnel vacuum sealed and the additional cost of building several kilometres under the sea. Adding the fact that maglev track is $40m/km gives an additional $260bn. This gives a $1tn total budget, which is significantly larger than the entire global air travel industry that it seeks to displace. I call snake oil on this. Also, the ET3 has been around since 2007; why is EETimes only reporting on it now?

NITESSH
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
NITESSH   7/17/2012 1:48:23 AM
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i think with a big capsule problem will arise in magnetic levitation am i right and please elaborate i am not getting it clearly

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