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Bert22306
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Bert22306   7/17/2012 12:51:24 AM
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Sounds really cool. I had read about this sort of concept. And a less credible idea, but intriguing anyway, drilling straight down through the earth to the other side, and using only gravity to provide the needed acceleration and deceleration. Comment: 1g refers to acceleration rather than force. It's 9.8 meters/sec/sec, or 32 ft/sec/sec. It should take just over 3 minutes of constant 1g acceleration to reach 4000 mph (=5867 ft/sec), from a standing start. The force required to achieve that depends on the mass of these capsules. I would think that any small shift in the soil surrounding these tunnels would, uuh, really spoil your day, if you're a passenger.

palf
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
palf   7/21/2012 4:47:44 AM
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Yes, and it takes about 100 miles to reach 4,000 mph at 1g. So the majority of the time is indeed just coasting. The energy requirements, especially considering regen braking, is really superb. I love this idea. Of course, drilling the hole will be spendy.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 6:45:37 AM
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You are correct that underground is at least three times the cost of above ground ET3 infrastructure. However, with ET3 we have much less dirt or rock to remove than with HSR or freeway tunnels. (a 4m bore to accommodate two 1.5m tubes and a service walkway). Over 95% of the ET3 network will be above ground and operate at 200 to 600mph.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 6:40:48 AM
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The car sized capsules only weigh 400lb empty, yet carry the same 800lb payload as the typical car. It takes about 2kWh to accelerate a 1200lb ET3 capsule to 350mph, or about 250kWh to accelerate to 4k mph (of course about 90% of the acceleration energy can be recovered as the capsule slows down at the destination).

NITESSH
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
NITESSH   7/17/2012 1:45:40 AM
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i would like to ask:- "what is the problem in present design so that we can have a capsule that can accomodate just people" there is vaccum in tunnel we can have even a bigger capsule plz answer in basic terms as i am just a graduate student

NITESSH
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
NITESSH   7/17/2012 1:48:23 AM
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i think with a big capsule problem will arise in magnetic levitation am i right and please elaborate i am not getting it clearly

MikeSB
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
MikeSB   7/17/2012 11:16:08 AM
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This is obviously completely implausible. London's current Crossrail project is costing £1.5bn for 21km of tunnels. For a 4000 mile trans-Atlantic tunnel, that scales to £460bn ($720bn), and that doesn't even include making the tunnel vacuum sealed and the additional cost of building several kilometres under the sea. Adding the fact that maglev track is $40m/km gives an additional $260bn. This gives a $1tn total budget, which is significantly larger than the entire global air travel industry that it seeks to displace. I call snake oil on this. Also, the ET3 has been around since 2007; why is EETimes only reporting on it now?

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/17/2012 8:39:24 PM
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They claim that their build costs are 1/10 that of high speed rail at about $2 million per mile for a 350 mph system. They go on to state that “Some licensees believe that cost will be so low that advertising could pay for most travel, just like it pays for TV, or free Internet.”

Ogemaniac
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Ogemaniac   7/18/2012 9:04:37 AM
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Because vacuum sealed tunnels are cheaper than welded tracks? Ten times cheaper, even? lol

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/18/2012 5:14:11 PM
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They claim that because of the light weight of their capsules, they use 1/20 of the material that high speed rail would use.

MikeSB
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
MikeSB   7/18/2012 2:30:56 PM
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Has it not occurred to you that their claims are completely unsubstantiated and they might just be lying to get venture capital?

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/18/2012 5:13:15 PM
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I have not checked the veracity of their claims. They state that they have an engineering study which backs their claims. It was apparently good enough for over 95 individuals/groups to purchase licenses for this technology. It sounds impressive at first but the license fee is only $100 so not really. However they do have a peer reviewed paper which was published last year. Check it out here, http://www.google.com/url?sa=t&rct=j&q=&esrc=s&source=web&cd=1&sqi=2&ved=0CCMQFjAA&url=http%3A%2F%2Fjmt.swjtu.edu.cn%2FEN%2Farticle%2FdownloadArticleFile.do%3FattachType%3DPDF%26id%3D8357&ei=sWBvT-L2JcfciALyotC9BQ&usg=AFQjCNG6j3ST1LLcd_gCAdhCqoxoci8F1g

GPBobby
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
GPBobby   7/20/2012 6:56:29 AM
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This is the stuff of urban legend. Unlike a drive-up tellers vacuum propelled cash can, this train is not propelled by any air pressure differential. It simply coasts in a drag-free airless tube after an initial acceleration. For bearings, think mag lev without propulsion. First, got to build the tube to withstand 4kg/cm2 pressure (at about 100 feet deep) and be rigid enough to withstand wave action flexing so as to maintain tight mag-lev tolerances. Got to keep the tube in place - either with multi propellors with gps feedback or bouys in opposition with deep sea anchors. Next, got to evacuate some 7.7 million cu meters of air. Next, capsule has to provide fresh air at atmosphere pressure for passenger comfort. Got a problem? Need escape hatches periodically which must have vacuum locks to admit you to 100 ft sea depth for prompt medical attention. And last, this thing has to have automatic terrorist detection and annihilation. I'm recommending everyone purchase a share in this, just to get the bridge that surely must come with it.

KB3001
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
KB3001   7/17/2012 11:27:05 AM
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Not going to happen across the atlantic (the cost is astronomical). Perhaps within continents...

NewYankEE
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
NewYankEE   7/17/2012 12:34:21 PM
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I'd be happy with a waterslide commute to work this morning ;-)

Hasmon
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Hasmon   7/17/2012 2:36:09 PM
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Why not use this within cities for high-speed package delivery...like they used to have in Paris 100 years ago? They used pneumatic pressure to zip letters along. This could be used to replace couriers, and it would be a lot safer delivering packages than trying it out on humans. It might even enable a proper e-commerce system...Imagine getting deliveries from amazon in an instant...actually wait--4000 mph is still too slow to cross the continent in less than one hour... For people, a tube built through the oceans would be the safest solution...earthquake proof and relatively safe from human interference. It could float a few dozen metres below the surface.

KB3001
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
KB3001   7/17/2012 3:23:48 PM
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"They used pneumatic pressure to zip letters along. " These systems are still used in banks/supermarkets nowadays to transfer cash, no?

GPBobby
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
GPBobby   8/30/2012 3:02:47 PM
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In the sea they're called Tsunamis.

S.Gilden
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
S.Gilden   7/17/2012 4:02:02 PM
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OOPS, what if the is a small problem problem while YOU are mid-way under the Atlantic... perhaps a minor vacume leak, or a power outage at the vaccum source... or an electrial outage on the levatation system... hum, maybe you also consider the use of a straight shot frictionless "tube flight" system that claims to get you anywhere in the world in 44 minutes ?? from 2-A PRESS, Binghamton, N. Y. Thurs., March 24,1966 'Tube' Research Rensselaer —UP)— Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute plans a $70,000 research facility, Project Tube Flight, to study the feasibility of high speed, aboveground tubes for mass transportation. The U. S. Commerce Department granted the contract for the work.

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/17/2012 8:33:09 PM
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They plan on having escape hatches every mile.

Bert22306
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Bert22306   7/17/2012 9:05:26 PM
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Heh. Ever try walking up to 1/2 a mile while holding your breath?

old account Frank Eory
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
old account Frank Eory   7/17/2012 9:24:34 PM
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Yeah, even if every passenger had emergency scuba gear and could make that trek of up to 1/2 mile to the nearest escape hatch, then what? Emerge from the hatch into the waters of the icy North Atlantic, at a depth of probably 50-100 feet below the surface?

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/17/2012 10:27:01 PM
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For underwater tubes, escape hatches would lead to escape capsules. I should probably clarify that these proposed tubes are quite narrow ranging in width from 2' to 5' with 51" being the supposed optimal width from a cost/capacity perspective. For a 2' diameter tube you would be lying down in a capsule.

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/17/2012 9:32:44 PM
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They don't envision people walking to the escape hatches. They state “In the rare event of stoppage in the tube, the capsules will be directed to the nearest escape hatch.”

SylvieBarak
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
SylvieBarak   7/17/2012 11:23:15 PM
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I'm having a claustrophobic panic attack just thinking about that... thanks Andrzej!

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/18/2012 12:31:51 AM
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Your very welcome Sylvie!

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/18/2012 5:18:22 PM
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I need to make a further clarification. 5' is the optimal tube width and 51” is the optimal width of the capsule.

old account Frank Eory
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
old account Frank Eory   7/17/2012 6:02:05 PM
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A full working system up and running within a decade? Right, because the planet has infinite financial resources to fund such an adventure. "space travel on earth" seems like an appropriate description. All the costs (and more) and all the safety risks of space travel -- just to save a few hours relative to an old-fashioned jet aircraft.

tb1
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
tb1   7/17/2012 6:53:19 PM
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"OOPS, what if the is a small problem problem while YOU are mid-way under the Atlantic..." That was my thought. Every idea looks good as long as you don't consider what can go wrong. It is hard to imagine anything worse than to be stuck thousands of miles away from land, under the ocean, in a vacuum tube.

NewYankEE
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
NewYankEE   7/18/2012 12:19:38 PM
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"It is hard to imagine anything worse than to be stuck thousands of miles away from land, under the ocean, in a vacuum tube." Maybe falling from the sky packed in a tube with other passengers and jet fuel might be worse but we risk that too (worse unless you pass out 1st). Travelers take risks - we only imagine we control them enough to get by. And FWIW I agree this sounds like another boondoggle project someone got a grant to study...still wishing for that Bond/LostInSpace jetpack to fly to work...or again a water slide would be nice in this weather :-)

anon9303122
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
anon9303122   7/17/2012 7:14:47 PM
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Or put a filament and a plate at one end . . .

mfkern
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
mfkern   7/17/2012 9:35:32 PM
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How is this not prior art? I guess you can get a patent on anything these days.

NewYankEE
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
NewYankEE   7/18/2012 12:21:51 PM
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It's all about the specific claims.

BobsView
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
BobsView   7/18/2012 3:49:47 PM
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"OOPS, what if there is a small problem problem while YOU are mid-way under the Atlantic..." By that reasoning, commercial flight across the ocean would not be feasible. What if the engine failed, etc, etc. The problem I have with this whole concept is flying along at 2500 MPH and smashing into a stalled vehicle ahead. I hope the patents have a super reliable way to detect obstacles in the path. Even a pebble in the path could be disasterous.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 7:00:54 AM
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If you read US patent 5,950,543 you will see that all this (and much more) was anticipated back in 1999 (and there are more than 20 more patents in the ET3 IP pool, with several more to file before US patent law transitions to "first to file" in March 2013).

Duane Benson
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Duane Benson   7/18/2012 3:49:47 PM
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I'd say that this is a person/group that doesn't understand the issues involved in scaling. Just because something works for shooting mail around in a building, or could be viable as a few mile demonstrator, doesn't mean that it is feasible on a large scale. And, really? who is going cram themselves into a 24" capsule (coffin?) and lay in one spot for an hour or two.

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/18/2012 5:31:30 PM
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If it's free, like some of the licensees claim it may be, then I would say the lineups would stretch for miles on the most popular routes.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 7:18:24 AM
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Duane, the author of this article copied gross errors from other articles. You are correct that pneumatic tube systems have scale issues (all that air drag on the entire tube is VERY energy intensive). However, if you would bother to do a little basic research you would realize that ET3 is NOT pneumatic tube transport typically used to move documents at bank drive-up windows. Evacuated Tube Transport Technologies (ET3) also has scale issues (make the tube double the optimal size and the cost increases by a factor of 8). We do NOT advocate 2' capsules. ET3 is designed to move cargo too. Car sized vehicles represent the best compromise of low cost, AND reasonable comfort and utility. Since all ET3 systems must be build to the same diameter to eventually network them together on a global basis, getting this diameter correct is the most important parameter. Considerable research shows the optimal capsule diameter to be 1.3m (51") in diameter. Full sized capsule mockups prove ET3 seating is much more comfortable than typical cars, aircraft, or trains.

BobsView
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
BobsView   7/18/2012 6:06:30 PM
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I can understand why the Chinese government would be interested in this. Right before the Chinese New Year, millions of migrant workers are stranded for days in train stations with no food or sanitation. For a very revealing and entertaining documentary about this, check out the movie, "Last Train Home" available on Netflix and Amazon (and other places).

tb1
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
tb1   7/18/2012 7:37:29 PM
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"It is hard to imagine anything worse than to be stuck thousands of miles away from land, under the ocean, in a vacuum tube." "Maybe falling from the sky packed in a tube with other passengers and jet fuel might be worse but we risk that too" Yes, but we understand the risks of flying (they are pretty low). And we have methods of rescue if things go wrong. What are the risks of this high speed tube? Is there any way of rescuing if the device gets stuck somehow? Or does everyone die? Lots of people died in the first attempts at flight. This is highly experimental. In fact, has anything of the sort (even a few miles long) been built? Build a working test unit and maybe people might be more likely to put some money behind the idea.

Andrzej11
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Andrzej11   7/18/2012 10:47:15 PM
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Interestingly enough Elon Musk gave a Fireside chat a few nights ago in which he mentions that he is about to reveal a fifth mode of transportation which he calls the hyperloop. See here, http://new.livestream.com/pandodaily/elonmusk/videos/1908918 It's suppose to be crash proof, immune to weather and solar powered. He envisions travel at twice the speed of an airliner with travel times of under 30 minutes between LA and San Francisco. He agreed when asked that it's like a Jetson's tunnel. However his tweet of July 15th says he will publish something in four weeks and that it is “not a vac tunnel”.

mrj
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
mrj   7/19/2012 7:10:02 AM
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For sure there're challenges with vacuum maglev -- especially the current unavailability of room temperature superconductors AFAIK.. but the prospect of using very little energy per trip is appealing :)

resistion
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
resistion   7/19/2012 9:00:40 AM
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If you get squirmy for few-minute CT or MRI scans, I think this is far worse.

crispdust
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
crispdust   7/19/2012 9:41:26 AM
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I entered a Blue Peter (UK TV) competition years ago with a similar idea. Didn't even get a badge!

rogerindy
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
rogerindy   7/19/2012 11:16:32 AM
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How about trying this idea out in a tunnel under theland firs? Like from New York to Chicago to Los Angeles, etc.It may be easier to achieve this than under the water. Going under the ocean may be tried out later.

R0ckstar
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
R0ckstar   7/19/2012 2:32:27 PM
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A trillion dollars is what this thing would ACTUALLY cost. For that price, let's just build exact replicas of London AND New York and place them next to each other. Problem solved.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 6:35:10 AM
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For the record, we do NOT advocate Atlantic crossing. Over 95% of ET3 routes will be above ground, and can be built for lerss than 1/10th the cost of elevated high speed rail (HSR), or 1/4th the cost of a 4-lane freeway. One reason is automated production of tubes, and ET3 uses less than 1/35th as much material to support 400lb capsules (with 800lb payload) than to support 100 ton locomotives, or 40ton trucks bumper-to-bumper across 4 lanes of freeway bridge.

GPBobby
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
GPBobby   7/20/2012 6:00:58 PM
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This is the stuff of urban legend. Unlike a drive-up tellers vacuum propelled cash can, this train is not propelled by any air pressure differential. It simply coasts in a drag-free airless tube after an initial acceleration. For bearings, think mag lev without propulsion. First, got to build the tube to withstand 4kg/cm2 pressure (at about 100 feet deep) and be rigid enough to withstand wave action flexing so as to maintain tight mag-lev tolerances. Got to keep the tube in place - either with multi propellors with gps feedback or bouys in opposition with deep sea anchors. Next, got to evacuate some 7.7 million cu meters of air. Next, capsule has to provide fresh air at atmosphere pressure for passenger comfort. Got a problem? Need escape hatches periodically which must have vacuum locks to admit you to 100 ft sea depth for prompt medical attention. And last, this thing has to have automatic terrorist detection and annihilation. And better add an iceberg detector - one Titanic is enough. I'm recommending everyone purchase a share in this, just to get the bridge that surely must come with it.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 6:28:31 AM
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The e-tubes (tm) must only resist one atm of pressure. FYI, 13mm thick Ductal (tm) UHS concrete has 9 times more strength than necessary, and is not porous as is normal concrete. While crossing oceans is possible using SFT (submerged floating tunnel) tech. we do not advocate it for initial ET3 routes. How many road or train tunnels (or ships) have "automatic terrorist detection and annihilation"? Since ET3 capsule occupants are disbursed over at least 35 times more distance than train or 747 passengers, the risk of terror is less (we prefer to focus ET3 safety measures on what kills 99% of people in transportation -- failure to control the vehicle, and failure to control conditions of travel).

JRM
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
JRM   7/20/2012 10:59:58 PM
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Drill the tunnel with a "subterrene". Tungsten thing that melts its way through the ground.

RDentonSr
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
RDentonSr   7/21/2012 5:01:51 PM
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Some very serious problems appear to me. Assuming the problems of residual atmospheric friction 'could' be overcome (i.e.-there is no perfect vacuum) and all the rest of the 'construction' mechanics could be accomplished (not such a simple assumption): 1. The lateral forces due to any very small misalignment would render the ride highly uncomfortable (airsickness bags?). 2. Maintaining alignment in the face of geological motions over that path length render a "bored" tunnel approach highly impractical and any other 'tube' maintenance very expensive even if achievable. 3. Where is the rest room for those riding in such a small and claustrophobic vehicle? (Duh!) - Science fiction? Yes! - Realizable? No.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 6:13:24 AM
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1&2) If you read the fist patent (of over 20 in our IP pool) US 5,590,543, you will learn that the high speed ET3 routes must be actively aligned with redundant systems. When underground (or under water) the 2 tubes of 1.5m dia. will be in a 4m dia. tunnel. This is less than 1/15th a much rock to remove as a HSR tunnel. 3) The capsules are about 150 cubic feet of capacity (the largest station wagon has a capacity of 137 ft^3). Just as with cars operating on a freeway, restrooms for ET3 are outside the vehicles. The "off ramps" (like a freeway) are available at 15min. intervals. If you can't hold your water more than 15min, wear a diaper! (or pay ten times more to take a train or jet).

Johnne
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Johnne   6/3/2013 2:42:13 PM
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There are many great ideas here, both pro and con. Vacuum environments seem like it may be a dangerous enclosure to live in, but space has been concurred. If they can accommodate all of the scenarios that may take place inside the tube, cracks, loss of vacuum, air, water, comfort, in years to come it may be something that might work. Who knows, people were skeptical about flying planes let along space flight.

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/22/2012 6:00:54 AM
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Sylvie Barak did not contact ET3 (tm) for this article. This article repeats many gross errors from other articles about by "journalists" that also failed to contact us. Some key points of error are: * ET3 is NOT a train (and hence not a "vactrain"). * We do NOT advocate ET3 crossing the Atlantic. NOTE: the Bering Strait is less than 90 miles of ocean to cross, and is less than 200' deep, tunneling underground under water (like the "Chunnel"). * We are NOT focused on "getting more capacity in the capsules". Cars have won the global transportation market, the capsules are sized to carry 4 to 6 passengers (or one to three euro-pallets of cargo) like a typical car. The capacity of ET3 at 350mph is over 10 capsules per second (able to move more passengers per hour than a 40 lane freeway). * Over 95% of the ET3 network will be at speeds of 200 to 600 mph, and above ground. * We were not asked for permission to use our copyrighted artwork in this poorly researched article. * The ET3 consortium is comprised by over 200 experts, companies, and institutions in 16 countries.

ANON1255185289979
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
ANON1255185289979   7/23/2012 9:41:14 AM
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Heard and understood. It's PR Daryl, and a pleasure to correct misunderstandings, among those who moments before knew nothing of the ET3 idea. All the best!

SylvieBarak
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
SylvieBarak   7/23/2012 9:49:59 PM
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Actually, Daryl, I did contact ET3. I emailed the contact address on your website and received no reply. Happy to do a more accurate follow up with you anytime! My email address is Sylvie.Barak@ubm.com As Attoman says below, it's always a pleasure to correct misunderstandings, and also to introduce new and novel concepts to people who haven't heard of them before. There is no need to get angry, just get in touch! I did, but sadly I received no reply. Email me anytime and let's get back on the right "track", so to speak. Best, Sylvie

DarylOster
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
DarylOster   7/27/2012 6:26:58 PM
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Sylvie, Thank your reply, and expressing a willingness to make corrections. I apologize that my post could be interpreted as being "angry". Frustrated would be a better word to describe my reaction to "churnilism" reporting being so pervasive that even mostly original articles (like yours) tend to copy gross errors that have been repeated and repackaged dozens of times. As "Attoman" (hi VK) points out, inaccurate articles provide opportunity for many to learn about this emerging field. Fortunately many of the inaccurate articles have a comment section (unfortunately most "churalists" do not take the time to read the comments on the articles they copy, or to make corrections on the articles they write). Due to the dozens of articles, we are experiencing thousands of e-mails, many are incorrectly filtered as spam, or do not make it to the "priority inbox", and get a slow (or no) response. I will search for your important message, and reply.

Etmax
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Etmax   7/22/2012 1:26:18 PM
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My biggest concern is that at 4000mph you have to guarantee your environment over an incredible distance (the stopping distance), where as planes have some degree of maneuverability and trains a shorter stopping distance in the event of problems. Also maintaining a vacuum over such a surface area is going to be an interesting challenge.

sudo
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
sudo   7/23/2012 5:08:12 AM
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Ooh-oh, and for the London-NY "train" they shouldn't forget to extend the vacuum tube by 3cm every year, due to continental drift! :-)

ANON1255185289979
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
ANON1255185289979   7/23/2012 10:23:30 AM
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Terraspan - Power to All the Peoples of the Earth Short Video - http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zKXbx9ssONo Sylvie there is more then one "vacuum" transport system that has been introduced based in part on the 67 year old patent of Robert Goddard (the father of all modern rocketry-included the so-called German Rocket Science). What is perhaps most interesting about the system called "terraspan" (SEE terraspan.org at www.youtube.com) is that it is privately funded, entirely below ground and principally a POWER DISTRIBUTION AND STORAGE SYSTEM. Like the initial use of airplanes(for mail) the system will make money for investors by recapturing electrical power lost today and redistributing power across continents and from renewable sources to reduce energy dependency and carbon dioxide. After providing its power distribution functions terraspan will begin transport of freight and perishables at its max speeds. American chickens will first travel between New York and London the same way that they do today through european tunnels the long way around in minutes. Always underground even in the Bering Straight and the English Channel. Terraspan is underground in buried tubes or machine bored tunnels. Terraspan ties together the Americas. Then adds Eurasia through the Bering straight and eventually, Africa, Malaysia and Australia. One rides in comfort in terraspan and passes the long way around to reach London from New York. When fully tested and uber-reliable, terraspan is unlikely to exceed 5000 mph making the New York/London trip via Canada/Alaska/Eurasia 2.5 hours.

bwadebaker
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
bwadebaker   7/23/2012 12:31:29 PM
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Larry Niven described this system of transporation in his "Ringworld" series of books in the 70's. Science-fiction often point the way toward the future's "new" ideas.

Johnne
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re: NYC to London on a 4,000 mph vacuum train
Johnne   6/3/2013 3:14:07 PM
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There are many great ideas here, both pro and con. Vacuum environments seem like it may be a dangerous enclosure to live in, but space has been concurred. If they can accommodate all of the scenarios that may take place inside the tube, cracks, loss of vacuum, air, water, comfort, in years to come it may be something that might work. Who knows, people were skeptical about flying planes let along space flight.



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