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t.alex
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re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
t.alex   8/9/2012 3:54:54 AM
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If the jury only comprise technical people that is equally unfair. Some may be Apple developer for long time and their fascination for Apple products will have some effect in their decision.

GREAT-Terry
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CEO
re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
GREAT-Terry   8/6/2012 5:38:37 AM
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Interesting story. Although I think the lawsuit just waste the energy and money of the two companies, having read stories like this is kind of fun.

djardine
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re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
djardine   8/6/2012 12:42:28 AM
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I wonder if Jobs envisioned this invasion of Apple's privacy when he declared patent war on Google and Samsung. I also wonder if this would have made him reconsider.

DrQuine
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CEO
re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
DrQuine   8/5/2012 10:57:35 PM
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Who would have ever guessed that we would learn about the development of an innovative technology through court proceedings and biographies? It is fascinating the variety of ways in which secret project details eventually become public.

chun wing
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re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
chun wing   8/5/2012 5:13:26 PM
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I am not a fan of both Apple and Samsung, but I think the problems do not stemmed from these companies. I think it is the patent law that needs a thorough reform. (I believe Apple is also a victim as they lost a lawsuit to Creative's "ZEN" patent because of the user interface of the iPod) As an engineer, I found it surprising that in the US, the judges do not have engineering technical background for these patent lawsuits. And even more surprisingly (from my patent class I took few years ago) is that the jury CANNOT have technical background because one jury may have larger influence over the rest juries if one have a stronger technical background than the others. I think patent is still extremely important to protect the IPs and innovations. But I think a jury comprised of technical people in the field is more appropriate, so that these lawsuits will not be focusing on the shape of the devices but rather than the "real" infringement of innovations.

t.alex
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Rookie
re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
t.alex   8/4/2012 1:39:33 PM
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Amazing the teams at Apple.

Stanley_
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Rookie
re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
Stanley_   8/4/2012 6:40:39 AM
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working night and weekend sound like samsung...

Stanley_
User Rank
Rookie
re: Court hears of Jobs’ penchant for secrecy
Stanley_   8/4/2012 6:39:27 AM
NO RATINGS
hmm.. it seems apple had a small team like samsung...



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