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Marc Laventurier
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Freelancer
re: what makes a great engineering space
Marc Laventurier   8/29/2012 6:17:37 PM
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Eric Schmidt (who did his PhD in the management of large software engineering projects at Berkeley in the early '80s) has described the Google ethos as a continuation of graduate school. I remember seeing him running around in motorcycle leathers and going 20m off campus for a Giant Burger with Bill Joy, where they may have been served by a PhD physicist, or maybe they made it across the street to the gyro joint where Kary Mullis worked between acid trips. Last time I visited Stanford, I parked next to a students' Ferrari...hold the mayo.

Brian Fuller2
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Rookie
re: what makes a great engineering space
Brian Fuller2   8/29/2012 8:51:39 PM
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@utilitus... that's the beginnings of a helluva book!

docdivakar
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CEO
re: what makes a great engineering space
docdivakar   8/29/2012 8:57:53 PM
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What intrigues me is companies come along every few years, proclaiming radical new ideas in corporate hierarchy and work environment that seem to work for a few years and then fizzles. I have not come across companies that produce long, sustainable and globalizable ideas (I refrain from using "corporate culture!") that can be replicated when it comes to work environment, creativity, productivity and customer satisfaction. May be I am wishing for too much! So this too shall pass... MP Divakar PS: FaceBook's building may appeal to some but it seems irrelevant to me when it comes to creativity & productivity!

Bert22306
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CEO
re: what makes a great engineering space
Bert22306   8/29/2012 9:31:39 PM
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Maybe I'm just getting too old. Whenever I hear what some manager or some personality claims to be a great "new" idea for an engineering workspace, my reaction is "whatever." It all depends on individuals. Yes, it's very helpful to be able to collaborate with your team. But at the same time, it's very distracting to have people all over the place talking on their phones, perhaps with teleconferen ces on speaker, or what have you, when you're trying to concentrate. Cubicles are not that great. It's too easy to hear over the partitions.

CK-Karl
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Rookie
re: what makes a great engineering space
CK-Karl   8/29/2012 10:32:54 PM
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The modern workspace is more closely resembling the emphasis of aesthetics in our society. Engineers traditionally have favored functionality over cosmetic appearances in many applications. Companies such as Apple are winning largely because of their focus beyond technical performance metrics. Employees' expectations, especially the younger generation, of their environment are naturally going to reflect the level of "experience" they have come to expect in other aspects of their lives. Sure, an engineer should be able to work just as well in a dull grey cube as a modern office. One issue with the old philosophy is that you are constantly reminded you are at work. New open and engaging spaces promote collaboration and make employees enjoy their space to the point they don't mind staying longer. Along with the new physical design of these buildings comes the new behavioral culture where employees are often encouraged to spend some of their time at work on non-work activities. These down periods are frequently cited as having overall increases in productivity from individuals over the course of a working day. The other key consideration is workplace differentiation. In places such as the Bay Area top talent has their choice of employers - all of whom have interesting projects along with high paying salaries. It is absolutely reasonable to believe that the culture and workplace is the deciding factor for some of these prospects. I understand there are different views of the how a workplace should be structured and managed. I don't believe this strategy is applicable to all industries but in the case of many software based businesses (or teams for that matter) I do see it being successful.

titux
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Rookie
re: what makes a great engineering space
titux   8/30/2012 9:23:20 AM
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You addressed a major point: open spaces are critical for quietness and quietness is critical for some activities that require concentration and that occur 'every now and then', especially in creative jobs. I have seen small open spaces where people were working quietly, even when speaking at the phone, but it is a rare experience and occurs only under some conditions: - people culture and education (my only positive experience was in the UK, I guess it may be the same in the USA, not certainly the best practice for other countries like mine) - the availability of enough closed meeting spaces to avoid that meetings and call confs are set up in the open space - the type of jobs I think that larger open spaces are more critical, since it is more and more unlikely that all the people within are doing the same type of activity at the same time, and so the chances for conflict (collaborative, noisy activities vs. individual quietness-seeking activities) are greater.

Duane Benson
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Blogger
re: what makes a great engineering space
Duane Benson   8/30/2012 3:15:04 PM
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As Bert mentioned, it really does depend on the individual. Some people work best in open "collaborative" work spaces. Some are more productive in caves. Even the lighting can have an impact. I've known engineers that prefer to work with the lights off and others that feel the need for extra light. The ideal work environment is probably one with a number of environmental options that the engineer can choose from. When management declares that they have the best solution for everyone, that generally means that they have lost touch.

Brian Fuller2
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Rookie
re: what makes a great engineering space
Brian Fuller2   8/30/2012 4:35:39 PM
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@CK-Karl, you make a point I hadn't thought about (in our own offices in San Francisco): openness, low walls, etc. make you want to stay longer (or at least not mind staying longer). That's true. Unfortunately, in our space (3.5-foot-high cube "walls"), the din can be very distracting. So we're seeing more and more people, earlier and earlier in the day, slip on their headphones and block it all out.

Koda23
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Rookie
re: what makes a great engineering space
Koda23   8/31/2012 12:36:40 AM
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I work in a business park in Silicon Valley where we have 2 story buildings with halways of offices ringing the outer part of the building and lab space in the middle - no cubicles. Most engineers share an office with another person and managers have a single office. It's nice being able to close the 8 ft tall door when you need to. Earlier in my career I worked at a campus where the offices faced out into the lab space, making it easy to go back and forth. One engineer rigged an LED above his office door to indicate if his phone was ringing, so he could see if from the lab. I've also worked in the classic "cube farm" with corner workstations, which makes it easy to tell if your coworkers are in their offices, but not my favorite work environment.

BigTech0
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Manager
re: what makes a great engineering space
BigTech0   8/31/2012 2:45:57 PM
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Our company makes a point of putting all engineers in hardwall offices with doors which can be closed. That way you can close the door if you need to concentrate, or if you will be noisy (conference call, extended conversation, etc.) It also helps everyone control the light level and to some extent the temperature as they prefer. But there are soft seating areas scattered liberally throughout the building, and the lunch area is just down the hall, so we get a lot of opportunities for collaboration. Thankfully, we also avoid beige in the overall color scheme. Walls are white, but with enough exceptions of bright, saturated color to keep it interesting. Hallways are generally short or curved, so you don't get that "drowning in a sea of offices" effect. The carpets, doorways, and furniture add texture. All told, it works fairly well.

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