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Streetrodder
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re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
Streetrodder   9/27/2012 3:47:32 PM
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I may need to dispute the "Cruze" vs. Corvette comparison. Removing GM from it, I bet more people worldwide would recognize "corvette" than "cruze". Frugal engineering is just coming about in medical technology. Equipment manufacturers are just finding out that adding more "bells and whistles" to medical equipment is decreasing the relibility of the equipment, making it more complicated to use and endangering patient care.

Paul H.
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re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
Paul H.   9/27/2012 3:37:43 PM
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My company gave me a 7" Zeki tablet that uses a Rockchip processor. The product is so frustrating to use I threw it away. I prefer products that are well designed.

junko.yoshida
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re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
junko.yoshida   9/27/2012 8:29:02 AM
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This Harvard Business Review article may help articulate what Carlos Ghosn, CEO, Renault-Nissan, for example, means by "frugal innovation." http://blogs.hbr.org/cs/2012/07/frugal_innovation_lessons_from.html

sprite0022
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re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
sprite0022   9/27/2012 5:28:52 AM
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yeah, in a slow change area this might work. like channel, LV. for cell phone maybe not, like vertu.

rwik78
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re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
rwik78   9/27/2012 3:59:31 AM
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Agreed on the theory, Bert. But you do have to consider the human aspect i.e: being present in all markets dilutes brand value. The average man knows GM for its Chevvy Cruze, not Corvette. And android sales, though robust in volume, is not making money. Diversification may serve mammoth organizations or supplier organizations. But for consumer markets, where wow factor is important, it may actually hurt sales for the flagship product if diversification is towards the low end of the spectrum. For some companies, again, Apple or BMW, its not worth the risk.

Bert22306
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CEO
re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
Bert22306   9/27/2012 1:05:32 AM
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"The bells and whistles are what gives you the premium price, which translates to larger per unit revenue. Think GM vs. BMW. ... They are simply not in the same league." But even that is overstated. Much of that, too, is merely "common wisdom" and media hype. First of all, profit does not translate to revenues. A company can make a lot more money by going for more volume of sales and less profit. This allows the company to diversify its products better, sell to more markets or market segments, and so on. Again, Apple is the exception to this rule, not the rule. As to the GM vs BMW comment, perhaps you should read the current issue of Car and Driver, where they review the Camaro convertible against the BMW 6 series convertible. For that matter, GM has a no-holds-barred sports car, the Corvette, that BMW does not compete against. What this article explains as a phenomenon for developing country markets is ALSO a phenomenon within any single country. Companies that want to make big revenues are always better off serving more than just the top segments of the economy. Android sales are very good in the US too!

rwik78
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re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
rwik78   9/27/2012 12:31:08 AM
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My 2 cents: Android may beat Apple in terms of volume by more than 2x. But what the theory ignores is that volume is not equal to profit. The bells and whistles are what gives you the premium price, which translates to larger per unit revenue. Think GM vs. BMW. Or Apple vs. Mediatech. They are simply not in the same league.

sranje
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Manager
re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
sranje   9/27/2012 12:11:28 AM
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Thank you very much tb1 - never heard of Muntzing - what a funny and instructive story Much appreciated

junko.yoshida
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Blogger
re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
junko.yoshida   9/26/2012 9:57:54 PM
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I understand that Apple is an abberation. No company survives with just one model -- iPhone -- for every country. But the point of this particular story is not about that. It is about how tech companies figure out a "good enough" product, and create a more imaginative business process, to create products in volume at a lower cost for many more people in the developing countries.

tb1
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Rookie
re: Yoshida in China: How Nokia failed, MediaTek won
tb1   9/26/2012 9:52:48 PM
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A generation ago that was called Muntzing: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muntzing

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