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bill.shockley
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re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
bill.shockley   10/8/2012 6:14:37 PM
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"if the ions can be moved to form and modify the TiO oxygen vacancy pn junction by the use of very little energy" They are not claiming this at all. Don't you remember the paper that made you think HP had a phase change device, because of the heat involved and the physical evidence of different phase states in the active element? The memristive magic happens at high current densities under very large potentials. Temperatures are around 300C.

resistion
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CEO
re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
resistion   10/3/2012 4:09:04 AM
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Yes I would expect so too.

R G.Neale
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re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
R G.Neale   10/2/2012 3:47:16 PM
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Resistion; If you are claiming the junction with the "flattened gradient" will have the same resistance, i.e.one of the data states, as a steep gradient, then your implied observation would be correct. I think you will find the leakage current across the shallow gradient will be much higher.

resistion
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CEO
re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
resistion   10/2/2012 1:28:19 PM
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Yes, enough heat can erase anything. But as the gradient flattens, this effect should weaken.

R G.Neale
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re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
R G.Neale   10/2/2012 9:52:25 AM
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Perhaps HP and S K Hynix have read the recently published paper: Fundamental Issues and Problems in the Realization of Memristors by Paul Meuffels and Robit Soni. http://arxiv.org/abs/1207.7319 And decided a delay was in order. I think the authors of the above reference have expressed a clear objection to the oxygen ionic PN junction model. My view has always been if the ions can be moved to form and modify the TiO oxygen vacancy pn junction by the use of very little energy, then at elevated temperatures thermal diffusion will remove the concentration gradient and the memory contents. If this cannot be proved by simple experiment then I think a metallic filament radial oxidation-reduction model offers a more likely explanation of the NV memory effect.

geekmaster
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CEO
re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
geekmaster   9/28/2012 7:31:10 PM
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Actually it was in the 90's

geekmaster
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CEO
re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
geekmaster   9/28/2012 7:30:53 PM
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MRAM is in development much earlier. I heard about it in the last decade already.

Justin860
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re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
Justin860   9/27/2012 6:43:33 PM
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Well, to refresh everyone's memory, this has been in development longer than 10 years. Below is an announcement by Stan Williams on Sept.9, 2002. Funny he called Flash memory nitch market. After more than 10 years, not a single chip came out, no spec. and just smoke and more smoke. No wonder HP is where it is today. Just google "2002 HP leaps toward next generation memory" HP scientist R. Stanley Williams, an HP Fellow and director of Quantum Science Research at HP Labs and his group have: created the highest density electronically addressable memory reported to date. combined, for the first time, both memory and logic using rewritable, nonvolatile molecular-switch devices; and fabricated the circuits using a process called nano-imprint lithography Williams said he would like to see commercialization of such a memory in five to 10 years. "Our most optimistic hope hope for this type of technology is five years," he said. The first products resulting from the work would likely be aimed at niche memory markets, such as Flash memory and other areas where a need for inexpensive, nonvolatile memory exists. The first products resulting from the work would likely be aimed at niche memory markets, such as Flash memory and other areas where a need for inexpensive, nonvolatile memory exists. Such a memory is expected to have a cost advantage over Flash memory when it hits the market because of the manufacturing process. "We view this as a highly manufacturable and scalable process," Williams said.

R0ckstar
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re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
R0ckstar   9/27/2012 6:29:13 PM
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I don't know if I agree with the intentional market introduction delay. If they really can build these "tomorrow", then I think if they do build it, they will come. It's not just about cannibalizing existing product, there are also new non competing sockets to consider. It's a completely new technology. Let's get this party started. Quite frankly, HP could use a bump about now after their really good run of bad decision making.

resistion
User Rank
CEO
re: HP, Hynix delay memristor debut
resistion   9/26/2012 7:13:10 PM
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Hynix also studying phase change and spun torque memories, more to wait and see.



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