Breaking News
Comments
Newest First | Oldest First | Threaded View
ssidman
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
ssidman   10/17/2012 1:03:15 PM
NO RATINGS
See for example the work of Steve Furber at University of Manchester (UK) with Amulet async ARM. There is also Prof Hava Siegelmann's work in computing "beyond the Turing limit", so-called analog field computing. Other examples of clock-free computing exist. These days, the asynchronous emphasis seems to be on minimizing EMI, rather than just average power consumption. I suppose if you had a low/scrambled noise asynchronous uC running your hot beverage maker, you could have a TEMPEST in a teapot.

BrianBailey
User Rank
Blogger
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
BrianBailey   10/16/2012 11:09:32 PM
NO RATINGS
Based on this article, I received an email from TODpix that have a film coming out about Turing titled Codebreaker. A trailer for it can be found here http://www.websandbox.co/codebreaker/index.html Additionally, TODpix's new crowdsourcing "Theater-on-Demand" platform allows individuals and groups to sign up their local theater for a viewing of select premiere movies, like Codebreaker (25+ seats will guarantee each new screen).

ABMorley
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
ABMorley   10/15/2012 10:16:47 AM
NO RATINGS
The "block" you peak of is a D-type flip-flop. They're async, internally.

WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
WKetel   10/14/2012 1:24:35 AM
NO RATINGS
In this world it is often a fact that people are treated according to how well they fit in. If one chooses a lifestyle that others find offensive, the others may be offended, and most folks choose to seek their friends from among those people who don't offend them. It just works that way. The trite truism, "Birds of a feather flock together" is an example. So if an individual acts in a manner that offends most people, they will probably not be treated as well.

WKetel
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
WKetel   10/14/2012 1:18:10 AM
NO RATINGS
It is true that asynchronous logic can be much faster than clocked logic, but my experience is that it is a lot harder to design for a number of reasons. Component variability is one very real and obvious obstacle, and the variability with temperature is a very real pain. One useful option is using "blocks", each asynchronous internally, but with clocking to keep all the paths in step. It really does work, and has the added advantage of leveling the power draw quite a bit. Unfortunately those who paid for those designs are quite secretive about what they do. But picture an elaborate software flow chart, with the different boxes working nearly instantly, but with a clock to tell the system to pass data. That is a gross simplification, but a valid explanation.

WireMan0
User Rank
CEO
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
WireMan0   10/13/2012 3:20:19 PM
NO RATINGS
Turing would have his own blog, which he world write with a Macintosh.

jbusco
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
jbusco   10/13/2012 1:58:08 PM
NO RATINGS
It's good to remember Alan Turing for his genius and contribution, and for the sad way he was treated. And, interesting to reflect on how the vast majority of designers are trapped in the synchronous design box. That's the only way I learned about in school!

willb6
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
willb6   10/13/2012 5:16:39 AM
NO RATINGS
Alan Turing was a bright star indeed. We are all poorer for the way he was treated. He applied his formidable intellect to help his government win a war, and look how he was rewarded. This crazy world -- yes, pretty much the whole world -- still struggles to value humanity when it doesn't exactly fit some rigid, antiquated notion. It makes me sad and angry that such a gentle soul would be driven to end his own life by the very country he served. Thank you, Mr. Bailey, for reminding us.

JCarlson
User Rank
Rookie
re: What were they thinking: If Alan Turing had lived to be 100…
JCarlson   10/12/2012 3:59:19 PM
NO RATINGS
In the 1960's I represented Dyad Systems of Columbia, MD. They were designing source data acquisition systems based on asynchronous circuits using "Dyad's". Their technology had been patented by Carlo Fuastini of Silver Spring, MD. I believe I got the first and only order they ever received (from NSA). The CMOS Dyad ICs used were built by Solid State Scientific of Montgomeryville, PA



EE Life
Frankenstein's Fix, Teardowns, Sideshows, Design Contests, Reader Content & More
Max Maxfield

Aging Brass: Cow Poop vs. Horse Doo-Doo
Max Maxfield
8 comments
As you may recall, one of the things I want to do with the brass panels I'm using in my Inamorata Prognostication Engine is to make them look really old. Since everything is being mounted ...

EDN Staff

11 Summer Vacation Spots for Engineers
EDN Staff
11 comments
This collection of places from technology history, museums, and modern marvels is a roadmap for an engineering adventure that will take you around the world. Here are just a few spots ...

Glen Chenier

Engineers Solve Analog/Digital Problem, Invent Creative Expletives
Glen Chenier
11 comments
- An analog engineer and a digital engineer join forces, use their respective skills, and pull a few bunnies out of a hat to troubleshoot a system with which they are completely ...

Larry Desjardin

Engineers Should Study Finance: 5 Reasons Why
Larry Desjardin
45 comments
I'm a big proponent of engineers learning financial basics. Why? Because engineers are making decisions all the time, in multiple ways. Having a good financial understanding guides these ...

Flash Poll
Top Comments of the Week
Like Us on Facebook
EE Times on Twitter
EE Times Twitter Feed

Datasheets.com Parts Search

185 million searchable parts
(please enter a part number or hit search to begin)